OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.

Notice: MagpieRSS [debug] Returning STALE object for http://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/feed in /home/linkove/linkoverload/magpierss/rss_fetch.inc on line 245

Example Output

Channel: Wikileaksisdemocracy

RSS URL:

Parsed Results (var_dump'ed)

object(MagpieRSS)#2 (23) {
  ["parser"]=>
  int(0)
  ["current_item"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["items"]=>
  array(10) {
    [0]=>
    array(11) {
      ["title"]=>
      string(51) "Getting the most therapeutic potential out of cells"
      ["link"]=>
      string(85) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/getting-the-most-therapeutic-potential-out-of-cells/"
      ["dc"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["creator"]=>
        string(12) "Tony Grantly"
      }
      ["pubdate"]=>
      string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 19:37:01 +0000"
      ["category"]=>
      string(43) "Health And SciencecellsPotentialtherapeutic"
      ["guid"]=>
      string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4854"
      ["description"]=>
      string(664) "Journal Reference: Stephen Lenzini, Koushik Debnath, Jagdish C. Joshi, Sing Wan Wong, Kriti Srivastava, Xue Geng, Ik Sung Cho, Angela Song, Raymond Bargi, James C. Lee, Gary C.H. Mo, Dolly Mehta, Jae-Won Shin. Cell–Matrix Interactions Regulate Functional Extracellular Vesicle Secretion from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells. ACS Nano, 2021; 15 (11): 17439 DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c03231 The finding offers ... Read more"
      ["content"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["encoded"]=>
        string(3844) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Stephen Lenzini, Koushik Debnath, Jagdish C. Joshi, Sing Wan Wong, Kriti Srivastava, Xue Geng, Ik Sung Cho, Angela Song, Raymond Bargi, James C. Lee, Gary C.H. Mo, Dolly Mehta, Jae-Won Shin. Cell–Matrix Interactions Regulate Functional Extracellular Vesicle Secretion from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells. ACS Nano, 2021; 15 (11): 17439 DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c03231

The finding offers new avenues for research around cellular therapies, which use transplanted cells — like stem cells or immune cells, either from the patient or a donor — to help the body heal or work better, and patients and their doctors want the most bang for their buck in terms of potency. For injuries in the lungs, like those caused by acute respiratory distress syndrome, treatments that use extracellular vesicles have shown promise, but remain expensive and limited by the number of donated cells needed to reach a therapeutic level.

The researchers, led by Jae-Won Shin, have been studying how extracellular vesicles work. Through experiments, they found that altering the material in which the donor cells are processed can have a strong impact on the potency of extracellular vesicles.

“We were very surprised that a simple environmental change could have such a significant impact,” said Shin, UIC assistant professor in the department of pharmacology and regenerative medicine and the department of biomedical engineering. “This tells us that cells interact differently in different tissues, and this impacts how they secrete extracellular vesicles and influence other cells around them.”

The key, they found, was using a soft hydrogel material that more closely resembles the natural environment of tissues to prepare the particles. When they compared the particles cultured from cells in traditional materials with those cultured in a softer material, they saw that the extracellular vesicles were secreted in a greater quantity in the softer substrate.

“In the stiff substrates, cytoskeletal structures in cells are dense and less flexible. This makes it difficult for extracellular vesicles to exit the cells. But in the soft substrate, these structures are less dense, more bendable and more spread out, making the environment more conducive to the secretion of the particles by cells,” said first author Stephen Lenzini, a UIC alumnus who worked on the study in Shin’s lab as a graduate student.

Shin said, “That’s why fewer donor cells are needed to produce the same number of particles.”

They also compared the therapeutic potential of the particles produced in the different materials. They observed that the same dose of extracellular vesicles produced from the softer substrate was much more effective at facilitating repair processes than the extracellular vesicles produced from a traditional harder substrate.

“Understanding this opens the door for many new avenues of investigation for lab and clinical trials of treatments that use donor extracellular vesicles to repair damaged tissues, like which occurs in the lungs of some COVID-19 patients who face complications like ARDS,” he said.

We would love to thank the writer of this write-up for this awesome content

Getting the most therapeutic potential out of cells

" } ["summary"]=> string(664) "Journal Reference: Stephen Lenzini, Koushik Debnath, Jagdish C. Joshi, Sing Wan Wong, Kriti Srivastava, Xue Geng, Ik Sung Cho, Angela Song, Raymond Bargi, James C. Lee, Gary C.H. Mo, Dolly Mehta, Jae-Won Shin. Cell–Matrix Interactions Regulate Functional Extracellular Vesicle Secretion from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells. ACS Nano, 2021; 15 (11): 17439 DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c03231 The finding offers ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(3844) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Stephen Lenzini, Koushik Debnath, Jagdish C. Joshi, Sing Wan Wong, Kriti Srivastava, Xue Geng, Ik Sung Cho, Angela Song, Raymond Bargi, James C. Lee, Gary C.H. Mo, Dolly Mehta, Jae-Won Shin. Cell–Matrix Interactions Regulate Functional Extracellular Vesicle Secretion from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells. ACS Nano, 2021; 15 (11): 17439 DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c03231

The finding offers new avenues for research around cellular therapies, which use transplanted cells — like stem cells or immune cells, either from the patient or a donor — to help the body heal or work better, and patients and their doctors want the most bang for their buck in terms of potency. For injuries in the lungs, like those caused by acute respiratory distress syndrome, treatments that use extracellular vesicles have shown promise, but remain expensive and limited by the number of donated cells needed to reach a therapeutic level.

The researchers, led by Jae-Won Shin, have been studying how extracellular vesicles work. Through experiments, they found that altering the material in which the donor cells are processed can have a strong impact on the potency of extracellular vesicles.

“We were very surprised that a simple environmental change could have such a significant impact,” said Shin, UIC assistant professor in the department of pharmacology and regenerative medicine and the department of biomedical engineering. “This tells us that cells interact differently in different tissues, and this impacts how they secrete extracellular vesicles and influence other cells around them.”

The key, they found, was using a soft hydrogel material that more closely resembles the natural environment of tissues to prepare the particles. When they compared the particles cultured from cells in traditional materials with those cultured in a softer material, they saw that the extracellular vesicles were secreted in a greater quantity in the softer substrate.

“In the stiff substrates, cytoskeletal structures in cells are dense and less flexible. This makes it difficult for extracellular vesicles to exit the cells. But in the soft substrate, these structures are less dense, more bendable and more spread out, making the environment more conducive to the secretion of the particles by cells,” said first author Stephen Lenzini, a UIC alumnus who worked on the study in Shin’s lab as a graduate student.

Shin said, “That’s why fewer donor cells are needed to produce the same number of particles.”

They also compared the therapeutic potential of the particles produced in the different materials. They observed that the same dose of extracellular vesicles produced from the softer substrate was much more effective at facilitating repair processes than the extracellular vesicles produced from a traditional harder substrate.

“Understanding this opens the door for many new avenues of investigation for lab and clinical trials of treatments that use donor extracellular vesicles to repair damaged tissues, like which occurs in the lungs of some COVID-19 patients who face complications like ARDS,” he said.

We would love to thank the writer of this write-up for this awesome content

Getting the most therapeutic potential out of cells

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638473821) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(26) "Taking new aim at COVID-19" ["link"]=> string(60) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/taking-new-aim-at-covid-19/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Tony Grantly" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 18:20:02 +0000" ["category"]=> string(28) "Health And ScienceaimCOVID19" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4849" ["description"]=> string(595) "Journal Reference: Martina Zafferani, Christina Haddad, Le Luo, Jesse Davila-Calderon, Liang-Yuan Chiu, Christian Shema Mugisha, Adeline G. Monaghan, Andrew A. Kennedy, Joseph D. Yesselman, Robert J. Gifford, Andrew W. Tai, Sebla B. Kutluay, Mei-Ling Li, Gary Brewer, Blanton S. Tolbert, Amanda E. Hargrove. Amilorides inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro by targeting RNA structures. Science Advances, ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7601) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Martina Zafferani, Christina Haddad, Le Luo, Jesse Davila-Calderon, Liang-Yuan Chiu, Christian Shema Mugisha, Adeline G. Monaghan, Andrew A. Kennedy, Joseph D. Yesselman, Robert J. Gifford, Andrew W. Tai, Sebla B. Kutluay, Mei-Ling Li, Gary Brewer, Blanton S. Tolbert, Amanda E. Hargrove. Amilorides inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro by targeting RNA structures. Science Advances, 2021; 7 (48) DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abl6096

In a study to appear Nov. 26 in the journal Science Advances, Hargrove and colleagues have identified chemical compounds that can latch onto these 3D structures and block the virus’s ability to replicate.

“These are the first molecules with antiviral activity that target the virus’s RNA specifically, so it’s a totally new mechanism in that sense,” Hargrove said.

Even more than 18 months into the pandemic, that’s good news. We have vaccines to prevent COVID-19, but effective, easy-to-administer drugs to help people survive and recover once they’ve been infected remain limited.

The virus is receding in some parts of the world, but cases are still surging in others where vaccines are in short supply. And even in regions with easy access to vaccines, COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy means many of the world’s eight billion people remain vulnerable to infection.

To infect your cells, the coronavirus must break in, deliver its genetic instructions in the form of RNA, and hijack the body’s molecular machinery to build new copies of itself. The infected cell becomes a virus factory, reading the 30,000 nucleotide “letters” of the virus’s genetic code and churning out the proteins the virus needs to replicate and spread.

Most antivirals — including remdesivir, molnupiravir and Paxlovid, the only antiviral drugs for COVID-19 that have been FDA-approved or are in line for approval — work by binding to these proteins. But Hargrove and colleagues are taking a different approach. They’ve identified the first molecules that take aim at the viral genome itself — and not just the linear sequence of A’s, C’s, G’s and U’s, but the complex three-dimensional structures the RNA strand folds into.

When the first terrifying hints of the pandemic started to make headlines, the team including Hargrove, Blanton Tolbert from Case Western Reserve University and Gary Brewer and Mei-Ling Li from Rutgers were already investigating potential drug candidates to fight another RNA virus — Enterovirus 71, a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in children.

They had identified a class of small molecules called amilorides that can bind to hairpin-like folds in the virus’s genetic material and throw a wrench in the virus’s replication.

To see if the same compounds could work against coronaviruses too, first they tested 23 amiloride-based molecules against another, far less deadly coronavirus responsible for many common colds. They identified three compounds that, when added to infected monkey cells, reduced the amount of virus within 24 hours of infection without causing collateral damage to their host cells. They also showed greater effects at higher doses. The researchers got similar results when they tested the molecules on cells infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Further work showed that the molecules stopped the virus from building up by binding to a site in the first 800 letters of the viral genome. Most of this stretch of RNA doesn’t code for proteins itself but drives their production.

The region folds in on itself to form multiple bulges and hairpin-like structures. Using computer modeling and a technique called nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the researchers were able to analyze these 3D RNA structures and pinpoint where the chemical compounds were binding.

The researchers are still trying to figure out exactly how these compounds stop the virus from multiplying, once they’re bound to its genome.

When it comes to using RNA as a drug target, Hargrove says the field is still in its early stages. Part of the reason is that RNA structures are unstable. They bounce around a lot more than their protein counterparts, which makes it hard to design molecules that can interact with them in specific ways.

“The binding pocket that you’re looking for may not even be present most of the time,” Hargrove said.

What’s more, 85% of the RNA in an infected cell doesn’t belong to the virus, but to the ribosomes — cellular particles made of RNA and protein — of its human host. “There’s a sea of competition,” Hargrove said.

But Hargrove is hopeful. The first small-molecule drug that works by binding to non-ribosomal RNA directly, rather than proteins, was just approved by the FDA last August, to treat people with a devastating disease called spinal muscular atrophy. “So while there are lots of challenges, it’s not impossible,” Hargrove said.

The researchers have a patent pending on their method. They want to modify the compounds to make them more potent, and then test them in mice “to see if this could be a viable drug candidate,” Hargrove said.

This isn’t the first time that coronaviruses have caused an outbreak, and it likely won’t be the last, the researchers say. In the last two decades, the same family of viruses was responsible for SARS, which emerged in China and spread to more than two dozen countries in 2002, and MERS, first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

The researchers determined that the loops and bulges of RNA they identified have remained essentially unchanged by evolution across related coronaviruses in bats, rats and humans, including the ones that caused the SARS and MERS outbreaks. That means their method might be able to fight more than just SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Clearly, more antivirals would be valuable weapons to have, so when the next pandemic hits we’ll be better prepared. Having more drugs on hand would have another benefit: fighting resistance. Viruses mutate over time. Being able to combine drugs with different mechanisms of action would make it less likely that the virus could develop resistance to all of them simultaneously and become impossible to treat, Hargrove said.

“This is a new way to think about antivirals for RNA viruses,” Hargrove said.

The researchers collaborated across seven institutions for this study, including Rutgers University, Case Western Reserve University, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Glasgow and the University of Michigan.

This research was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (R35GM124785, GM126833), Tobacco Settlement Fund (21-5734-0010), Medical Research Council of the United Kingdom (MC_UU_12014/12), and Duke University.

We wish to thank the author of this post for this awesome material

Taking new aim at COVID-19

" } ["summary"]=> string(595) "Journal Reference: Martina Zafferani, Christina Haddad, Le Luo, Jesse Davila-Calderon, Liang-Yuan Chiu, Christian Shema Mugisha, Adeline G. Monaghan, Andrew A. Kennedy, Joseph D. Yesselman, Robert J. Gifford, Andrew W. Tai, Sebla B. Kutluay, Mei-Ling Li, Gary Brewer, Blanton S. Tolbert, Amanda E. Hargrove. Amilorides inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro by targeting RNA structures. Science Advances, ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(7601) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Martina Zafferani, Christina Haddad, Le Luo, Jesse Davila-Calderon, Liang-Yuan Chiu, Christian Shema Mugisha, Adeline G. Monaghan, Andrew A. Kennedy, Joseph D. Yesselman, Robert J. Gifford, Andrew W. Tai, Sebla B. Kutluay, Mei-Ling Li, Gary Brewer, Blanton S. Tolbert, Amanda E. Hargrove. Amilorides inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro by targeting RNA structures. Science Advances, 2021; 7 (48) DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abl6096

In a study to appear Nov. 26 in the journal Science Advances, Hargrove and colleagues have identified chemical compounds that can latch onto these 3D structures and block the virus’s ability to replicate.

“These are the first molecules with antiviral activity that target the virus’s RNA specifically, so it’s a totally new mechanism in that sense,” Hargrove said.

Even more than 18 months into the pandemic, that’s good news. We have vaccines to prevent COVID-19, but effective, easy-to-administer drugs to help people survive and recover once they’ve been infected remain limited.

The virus is receding in some parts of the world, but cases are still surging in others where vaccines are in short supply. And even in regions with easy access to vaccines, COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy means many of the world’s eight billion people remain vulnerable to infection.

To infect your cells, the coronavirus must break in, deliver its genetic instructions in the form of RNA, and hijack the body’s molecular machinery to build new copies of itself. The infected cell becomes a virus factory, reading the 30,000 nucleotide “letters” of the virus’s genetic code and churning out the proteins the virus needs to replicate and spread.

Most antivirals — including remdesivir, molnupiravir and Paxlovid, the only antiviral drugs for COVID-19 that have been FDA-approved or are in line for approval — work by binding to these proteins. But Hargrove and colleagues are taking a different approach. They’ve identified the first molecules that take aim at the viral genome itself — and not just the linear sequence of A’s, C’s, G’s and U’s, but the complex three-dimensional structures the RNA strand folds into.

When the first terrifying hints of the pandemic started to make headlines, the team including Hargrove, Blanton Tolbert from Case Western Reserve University and Gary Brewer and Mei-Ling Li from Rutgers were already investigating potential drug candidates to fight another RNA virus — Enterovirus 71, a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in children.

They had identified a class of small molecules called amilorides that can bind to hairpin-like folds in the virus’s genetic material and throw a wrench in the virus’s replication.

To see if the same compounds could work against coronaviruses too, first they tested 23 amiloride-based molecules against another, far less deadly coronavirus responsible for many common colds. They identified three compounds that, when added to infected monkey cells, reduced the amount of virus within 24 hours of infection without causing collateral damage to their host cells. They also showed greater effects at higher doses. The researchers got similar results when they tested the molecules on cells infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Further work showed that the molecules stopped the virus from building up by binding to a site in the first 800 letters of the viral genome. Most of this stretch of RNA doesn’t code for proteins itself but drives their production.

The region folds in on itself to form multiple bulges and hairpin-like structures. Using computer modeling and a technique called nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the researchers were able to analyze these 3D RNA structures and pinpoint where the chemical compounds were binding.

The researchers are still trying to figure out exactly how these compounds stop the virus from multiplying, once they’re bound to its genome.

When it comes to using RNA as a drug target, Hargrove says the field is still in its early stages. Part of the reason is that RNA structures are unstable. They bounce around a lot more than their protein counterparts, which makes it hard to design molecules that can interact with them in specific ways.

“The binding pocket that you’re looking for may not even be present most of the time,” Hargrove said.

What’s more, 85% of the RNA in an infected cell doesn’t belong to the virus, but to the ribosomes — cellular particles made of RNA and protein — of its human host. “There’s a sea of competition,” Hargrove said.

But Hargrove is hopeful. The first small-molecule drug that works by binding to non-ribosomal RNA directly, rather than proteins, was just approved by the FDA last August, to treat people with a devastating disease called spinal muscular atrophy. “So while there are lots of challenges, it’s not impossible,” Hargrove said.

The researchers have a patent pending on their method. They want to modify the compounds to make them more potent, and then test them in mice “to see if this could be a viable drug candidate,” Hargrove said.

This isn’t the first time that coronaviruses have caused an outbreak, and it likely won’t be the last, the researchers say. In the last two decades, the same family of viruses was responsible for SARS, which emerged in China and spread to more than two dozen countries in 2002, and MERS, first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

The researchers determined that the loops and bulges of RNA they identified have remained essentially unchanged by evolution across related coronaviruses in bats, rats and humans, including the ones that caused the SARS and MERS outbreaks. That means their method might be able to fight more than just SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Clearly, more antivirals would be valuable weapons to have, so when the next pandemic hits we’ll be better prepared. Having more drugs on hand would have another benefit: fighting resistance. Viruses mutate over time. Being able to combine drugs with different mechanisms of action would make it less likely that the virus could develop resistance to all of them simultaneously and become impossible to treat, Hargrove said.

“This is a new way to think about antivirals for RNA viruses,” Hargrove said.

The researchers collaborated across seven institutions for this study, including Rutgers University, Case Western Reserve University, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Glasgow and the University of Michigan.

This research was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (R35GM124785, GM126833), Tobacco Settlement Fund (21-5734-0010), Medical Research Council of the United Kingdom (MC_UU_12014/12), and Duke University.

We wish to thank the author of this post for this awesome material

Taking new aim at COVID-19

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638469202) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(57) "Who hopes to recover for Rome? Simone Inzaghi’s answer" ["link"]=> string(86) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/who-hopes-to-recover-for-rome-simone-inzaghis-answer/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(8) "Tim Hall" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 18:17:48 +0000" ["category"]=> string(41) "SportAnswerhopesInzaghisrecoverRomeSimone" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4843" ["description"]=> string(588) "The coach after the 2-0 victory at San Siro: “We had some defections but I am very satisfied with the boys. We know we have not done anything yet and on Saturday another challenging match against Roma awaits us. We must continue on this one. road, because we run ahead “. And he takes stock ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5939) "

The coach after the 2-0 victory at San Siro: “We had some defections but I am very satisfied with the boys. We know we have not done anything yet and on Saturday another challenging match against Roma awaits us. We must continue on this one. road, because we run ahead “. And he takes stock of possible recoveries in defense in view of Roma

INTER 2-0 SPEZIA, GOALS AND HIGHLIGHTS: VIDEO

Satisfaction in the voice of Simone Inzaghi after the 2-0 ofInter sany Spice. Nerazzurri who rise to 34 points in the standings and give continuity to the victory of the last round in Venice. “We knew that it was an important game and not an easy one. The boys were very good – explains the coach – they immediately entered the game with the right attitude and I am very satisfied. We are growing, now there are important matches but with this union and with this desire we can still grow. We played with patience and order, giving very little. We must continue on this path, because we run in front and nobody stops “.

“I have faith in penalty takers. Dumfries added value”

see also



Inter-Spezia 2-0 HIGHLIGHTS

The Inter coach also talks about the penalty takers chapter, with Lautaro scoring for the 2-0 and for the second game in a row from the spot. “I have good shooters like Lautaro, Calhanoglu and Perisic and I trust them. They are taking turns. We are the best attack and we create a lot. I think there is little to say to the boys. “The coach also focuses on the constant growth of Calhanoglu: “Calha has put in his own, he’s a player of quality and quantity, who grows from game to game. I’m satisfied with him, as well as with everyone else.” Words of esteem also for Dumfries: “It did very well, I’ve always used it alternating with Darmian. He comes from another league and you have to be patient because it will certainly be an added value for me and for Inter. He’s a positive guy, who always trains in the best way and has fit in well in the locker room. “

“I hope to recover someone in defense for Rome”

read also



Mou: “If I were in Zaniolo, I would leave Serie A”

Look at the Roma, next opponent at the Olimpico on Saturday afternoon: “If I hope to recover someone? We will see him in the next few days, even today I had two full-time defenders but I placed Dimarco back there and I was calm. We hope to recover Sticks – Inzaghi explains – last night he had a high fever and stomach problems. The free is starting to work, Saturday will be 22 days after his injury. He has a good chance of re-entering too Kolarov, per Darmian instead we have to wait “. The conditions of Vidal and Sanchez must also be evaluated:”Vidal he took a blow on the foot in the last action of the game, I hope it’s nothing serious. Sanchez he’s fine, he has done the last two training sessions very well. He moved well, he was fine before the break, then I got him back, not in good condition. In any case, he works in the best way “.

We wish to say thanks to the writer of this post for this amazing web content

Who hopes to recover for Rome? Simone Inzaghi’s answer

" } ["summary"]=> string(588) "The coach after the 2-0 victory at San Siro: “We had some defections but I am very satisfied with the boys. We know we have not done anything yet and on Saturday another challenging match against Roma awaits us. We must continue on this one. road, because we run ahead “. And he takes stock ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5939) "

The coach after the 2-0 victory at San Siro: “We had some defections but I am very satisfied with the boys. We know we have not done anything yet and on Saturday another challenging match against Roma awaits us. We must continue on this one. road, because we run ahead “. And he takes stock of possible recoveries in defense in view of Roma

INTER 2-0 SPEZIA, GOALS AND HIGHLIGHTS: VIDEO

Satisfaction in the voice of Simone Inzaghi after the 2-0 ofInter sany Spice. Nerazzurri who rise to 34 points in the standings and give continuity to the victory of the last round in Venice. “We knew that it was an important game and not an easy one. The boys were very good – explains the coach – they immediately entered the game with the right attitude and I am very satisfied. We are growing, now there are important matches but with this union and with this desire we can still grow. We played with patience and order, giving very little. We must continue on this path, because we run in front and nobody stops “.

“I have faith in penalty takers. Dumfries added value”

see also



Inter-Spezia 2-0 HIGHLIGHTS

The Inter coach also talks about the penalty takers chapter, with Lautaro scoring for the 2-0 and for the second game in a row from the spot. “I have good shooters like Lautaro, Calhanoglu and Perisic and I trust them. They are taking turns. We are the best attack and we create a lot. I think there is little to say to the boys. “The coach also focuses on the constant growth of Calhanoglu: “Calha has put in his own, he’s a player of quality and quantity, who grows from game to game. I’m satisfied with him, as well as with everyone else.” Words of esteem also for Dumfries: “It did very well, I’ve always used it alternating with Darmian. He comes from another league and you have to be patient because it will certainly be an added value for me and for Inter. He’s a positive guy, who always trains in the best way and has fit in well in the locker room. “

“I hope to recover someone in defense for Rome”

read also



Mou: “If I were in Zaniolo, I would leave Serie A”

Look at the Roma, next opponent at the Olimpico on Saturday afternoon: “If I hope to recover someone? We will see him in the next few days, even today I had two full-time defenders but I placed Dimarco back there and I was calm. We hope to recover Sticks – Inzaghi explains – last night he had a high fever and stomach problems. The free is starting to work, Saturday will be 22 days after his injury. He has a good chance of re-entering too Kolarov, per Darmian instead we have to wait “. The conditions of Vidal and Sanchez must also be evaluated:”Vidal he took a blow on the foot in the last action of the game, I hope it’s nothing serious. Sanchez he’s fine, he has done the last two training sessions very well. He moved well, he was fine before the break, then I got him back, not in good condition. In any case, he works in the best way “.

We wish to say thanks to the writer of this post for this amazing web content

Who hopes to recover for Rome? Simone Inzaghi’s answer

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638469068) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(127) "Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck are official: What is the effect of ‘Bennifer 2.0’ on the world? | People | Entertainment" ["link"]=> string(146) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/jennifer-lopez-and-ben-affleck-are-official-what-is-the-effect-of-bennifer-2-0-on-the-world-people-entertainment/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Sally Scully" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 18:14:16 +0000" ["category"]=> string(67) "CelebrityAffleckBenBenniferEntertainmentJenniferLopezofficialpeople" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4837" ["description"]=> string(816) "Almost two decades later, this pair of actors infects the same complicity and romance, but with a greater degree of daring that today conquers the whole world. The New York Times October 1, 2021 – 1:16 PM The J. Lo effect is difficult to define, but easy to identify. In general, it refers to the ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6272) "

Almost two decades later, this pair of actors infects the same complicity and romance, but with a greater degree of daring that today conquers the whole world.

The New York Times

The J. Lo effect is difficult to define, but easy to identify. In general, it refers to the way Jennifer Lopez, 52, defies almost all human standards (beauty, success, age, flexibility, relevance). The expression has been applied at various points in his career, often to express amazement.

At 41 years old, convinced the producers of American Idol that they paid him about 12 million dollars to replace Simon Cowell, sparking a gold rush of renowned judges demanding similar rewards. What was that? “Call it the J. Lo effect,” he proclaimed The Hollywood Reporter.

Got a Las Vegas residency at age 46 and avoided a downhill fall in the parable of fame. What was that? “The J. Lo effect,” read the headline of Las Vegas Weekly. Swept away the 2020 Super Bowl halftime show at age 50. “The total effect of J. Lo was somewhat hypnotic,” wrote the fashion critic of The New York Times, Vanessa Friedman.

And so, In early 2021, actor Ben Affleck reappeared in his love life. It’s 2003 again and that effect spread to him too! The rumors were confirmed.

Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck attend the 2021 Venice Film Festival. Photo: The Universe

“The idea is that he must have a lot to offer to date someone who is such a good match,” said Jean Fitzpatrick, a couples therapist in Manhattan. “By being in a relationship with a highly desirable woman, a man conveys the idea that he has at least some desirable traits”Said Ryan C. Anderson, a researcher at Monash University in Australia.

López is as powerful as Affleck, if not more, sums up The New York Times. In terms of cultural and economic capital; He is estimated to be worth $ 400 million and is the 56th highest paid celebrity in the world, according to Forbes. What’s more, it was she, with her 168 million followers on Instagram versus 5 million for Affleck, who posted the big reveal of the relationship. “She’s the one who announces their romance and has a say in her self-introduction,” McDonnell said. “Although, of course, Affleck can benefit from it.”

In a recent interview, the director and Oscar winner for the film Argo (2012), spoke for the first time about López, after their reconciliation and recognized the global influence of his artistic career.

“I am in awe of Jennifer’s effect on the world,” he said. “She has inspired a huge group of people to feel like they have a seat at the table in this country. That is an effect that few people throughout history have, one that I will never know and one that I can only support and admire with respect ”.

Can the positive effects of dating someone like Lopez last after a breakup? “It’s not clear how long a person remains desirable (how long the ‘glow’ lasts),” Anderson said. “What we do know is that someone who is romanticly desirable now is generally more valued than someone who was romanticly desirable previously.”. But don’t tell Álex Rodríguez!

We wish to give thanks to the writer of this article for this awesome web content

Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck are official: What is the effect of ‘Bennifer 2.0’ on the world? | People | Entertainment

" } ["summary"]=> string(816) "Almost two decades later, this pair of actors infects the same complicity and romance, but with a greater degree of daring that today conquers the whole world. The New York Times October 1, 2021 – 1:16 PM The J. Lo effect is difficult to define, but easy to identify. In general, it refers to the ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(6272) "

Almost two decades later, this pair of actors infects the same complicity and romance, but with a greater degree of daring that today conquers the whole world.

The New York Times

The J. Lo effect is difficult to define, but easy to identify. In general, it refers to the way Jennifer Lopez, 52, defies almost all human standards (beauty, success, age, flexibility, relevance). The expression has been applied at various points in his career, often to express amazement.

At 41 years old, convinced the producers of American Idol that they paid him about 12 million dollars to replace Simon Cowell, sparking a gold rush of renowned judges demanding similar rewards. What was that? “Call it the J. Lo effect,” he proclaimed The Hollywood Reporter.

Got a Las Vegas residency at age 46 and avoided a downhill fall in the parable of fame. What was that? “The J. Lo effect,” read the headline of Las Vegas Weekly. Swept away the 2020 Super Bowl halftime show at age 50. “The total effect of J. Lo was somewhat hypnotic,” wrote the fashion critic of The New York Times, Vanessa Friedman.

And so, In early 2021, actor Ben Affleck reappeared in his love life. It’s 2003 again and that effect spread to him too! The rumors were confirmed.

Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck attend the 2021 Venice Film Festival. Photo: The Universe

“The idea is that he must have a lot to offer to date someone who is such a good match,” said Jean Fitzpatrick, a couples therapist in Manhattan. “By being in a relationship with a highly desirable woman, a man conveys the idea that he has at least some desirable traits”Said Ryan C. Anderson, a researcher at Monash University in Australia.

López is as powerful as Affleck, if not more, sums up The New York Times. In terms of cultural and economic capital; He is estimated to be worth $ 400 million and is the 56th highest paid celebrity in the world, according to Forbes. What’s more, it was she, with her 168 million followers on Instagram versus 5 million for Affleck, who posted the big reveal of the relationship. “She’s the one who announces their romance and has a say in her self-introduction,” McDonnell said. “Although, of course, Affleck can benefit from it.”

In a recent interview, the director and Oscar winner for the film Argo (2012), spoke for the first time about López, after their reconciliation and recognized the global influence of his artistic career.

“I am in awe of Jennifer’s effect on the world,” he said. “She has inspired a huge group of people to feel like they have a seat at the table in this country. That is an effect that few people throughout history have, one that I will never know and one that I can only support and admire with respect ”.

Can the positive effects of dating someone like Lopez last after a breakup? “It’s not clear how long a person remains desirable (how long the ‘glow’ lasts),” Anderson said. “What we do know is that someone who is romanticly desirable now is generally more valued than someone who was romanticly desirable previously.”. But don’t tell Álex Rodríguez!

We wish to give thanks to the writer of this article for this awesome web content

Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck are official: What is the effect of ‘Bennifer 2.0’ on the world? | People | Entertainment

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638468856) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(113) "From BTS to Lee Jung Jae, Here’s the Complete List of Winners of the 2021 Asia Artist Awards: Okezone Celebrity" ["link"]=> string(142) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/from-bts-to-lee-jung-jae-heres-the-complete-list-of-winners-of-the-2021-asia-artist-awards-okezone-celebrity/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Sally Scully" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 18:00:32 +0000" ["category"]=> string(69) "ShowsArtistAsiaAwardsBTSCelebrityCompleteJaeJungLeeListOkezoneWinners" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4831" ["description"]=> string(772) "SEOUL – The Asia Artist Awards event has been completed at the KBS Arena Hall, Seoul, South Korea, on December 2, 2021. The event was hosted by Super Junior’s Leeteuk and IVE’s Jang Won Young. Initiated by Star News and Star Continent, this award event was first held in 2016 and serves as a platform ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5163) "

SEOUL – The Asia Artist Awards event has been completed at the KBS Arena Hall, Seoul, South Korea, on December 2, 2021. The event was hosted by Super Junior’s Leeteuk and IVE’s Jang Won Young.

Initiated by Star News and Star Continent, this award event was first held in 2016 and serves as a platform for actors and musicians in Asia. AAA 2021 awarded nine daesang this year.

Kesembilan daesang itu terbagi atas: Song of the Year (BTS), Actor of the Year (Lee Jung Jae), TV Actor of the Year (Lee Seung Gi), Film Actor of the Year (Yoo Ah In), Album of the Year (NCT127), Trot of the Year (Lim Young Woong), Performance of the Year (Stray kids).

The two remaining categories are Singer of the Year (SEVENTEEN) and Stage of the Year (aespa). The following is the complete list of winners of the 2021 Asia Artist Awards as quoted from Soompi, on Thursday (2/12/2021).

DAESANG (Grand Prize)

Song of the Year: Butter (BTS)

Actor of the Year: Lee Jung Jae

TV Actor of the Year: Lee Seung Gi

Film Actor of the Year: Yoo Ah In

Album of the Year: NCT 127

Trot of the Year: Lim Young Woong

Performance of the Year: Stray Kids

Singer of the Year: SEVENTEEN

Stage of the Year: aespa

Best New Artist (Penyanyi): ENHYPEN, aespa

Best New Artist (Aktor): Lee Do Hyun

AAA Focus (Singer): DKB, KINGDOM, BLITZERS

AAA Focus (Aktor): Doyoung NCT, Park Gun Il

AAA Potential (Penyanyi): AleXa, T1419

AAA Potential (Aktor): NU’EST’s Minhyun

AAA New Wave (Penyanyi): STAYC, Weekly

AAA New Wave (Aktor): Na In Woo

RET Popularity Award (Penyanyi): Lim Young Woong, EXO, TWICE, CL

RET Popularity Award (Aktor): Song Ji Hyo, Kim Seon Ho

U+ Idol Live Popularity Award (Singer): BTS, Lim Young Woong, IU

U+ Idol Live Popularity Award (Aktor): Jung Ho Yeon, Kim Seon Ho

AAA Best OST: Lim Young Woong (Love Always Run Away dari drama Young Lady and Gentleman)

AAA Best Producer: Woozi SEVENTEEN

AAA Best Creator: Brave Brothers

AAA Best Music Video: EVERGLOW

AAA Icon (Penyanyi): WOODZ (Cho Seung Youn)

AAA Icon (Actor): Ryu Kyung Soo

AAA Hot Trend (Penyanyi): Brave Girls, aespa

AAA Hot Trend (Aktor): Lee Jung Jae

AAA Best Emotive (Penyanyi): WJSN CHOCOME, Kwon Eun Bi

AAA Best Emotive (Aktor): Cha Eun Woo ASTRO, Moon Ga Young

AAA Asia Celebrity (Penyanyi): BamBam GOT7, THE BOYZ

AAA Asia Celebrity (Aktor): Yoo Ah In, Metawin Opas-iamkajorn

AAA Best Choice (Penyanyi): PENTAGON, MOMOLAND, Golden Child

AAA Best Choice (Actor): Lee Jun Young (U-KISSS), Joo Suk Tae

AAA Scene Stealer: Cha Ji Yeon

AAA Best Acting Award: Yuri SNSD, Sung Hoon

AAA Best Musician: Kang Daniel, ITZY, ASTRO, Wonho, THE BOYZ

AAA Best Actor: Park Joo Mi, Heo Sung Tae, Kim Joo Ryoung

AAA Fabulous (Penyanyi): SEVENTEEN

AAA Fabulous (Actor): Lee Jung Jae

AAA Best Achievement: NU’EST

AAA Best Artist (Penyanyi): BamBam, ENHYPEN, Brave Girls

AAA Best Artist (Actor): Jeon Yeo Been, Han So Hee

History of Songs Award: Sandaime J Soul Brothers from EXILE TRIBE.*

(SIS)

We want to say thanks to the author of this article for this amazing content

From BTS to Lee Jung Jae, Here’s the Complete List of Winners of the 2021 Asia Artist Awards: Okezone Celebrity

" } ["summary"]=> string(772) "SEOUL – The Asia Artist Awards event has been completed at the KBS Arena Hall, Seoul, South Korea, on December 2, 2021. The event was hosted by Super Junior’s Leeteuk and IVE’s Jang Won Young. Initiated by Star News and Star Continent, this award event was first held in 2016 and serves as a platform ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5163) "

SEOUL – The Asia Artist Awards event has been completed at the KBS Arena Hall, Seoul, South Korea, on December 2, 2021. The event was hosted by Super Junior’s Leeteuk and IVE’s Jang Won Young.

Initiated by Star News and Star Continent, this award event was first held in 2016 and serves as a platform for actors and musicians in Asia. AAA 2021 awarded nine daesang this year.

Kesembilan daesang itu terbagi atas: Song of the Year (BTS), Actor of the Year (Lee Jung Jae), TV Actor of the Year (Lee Seung Gi), Film Actor of the Year (Yoo Ah In), Album of the Year (NCT127), Trot of the Year (Lim Young Woong), Performance of the Year (Stray kids).

The two remaining categories are Singer of the Year (SEVENTEEN) and Stage of the Year (aespa). The following is the complete list of winners of the 2021 Asia Artist Awards as quoted from Soompi, on Thursday (2/12/2021).

DAESANG (Grand Prize)

Song of the Year: Butter (BTS)

Actor of the Year: Lee Jung Jae

TV Actor of the Year: Lee Seung Gi

Film Actor of the Year: Yoo Ah In

Album of the Year: NCT 127

Trot of the Year: Lim Young Woong

Performance of the Year: Stray Kids

Singer of the Year: SEVENTEEN

Stage of the Year: aespa

Best New Artist (Penyanyi): ENHYPEN, aespa

Best New Artist (Aktor): Lee Do Hyun

AAA Focus (Singer): DKB, KINGDOM, BLITZERS

AAA Focus (Aktor): Doyoung NCT, Park Gun Il

AAA Potential (Penyanyi): AleXa, T1419

AAA Potential (Aktor): NU’EST’s Minhyun

AAA New Wave (Penyanyi): STAYC, Weekly

AAA New Wave (Aktor): Na In Woo

RET Popularity Award (Penyanyi): Lim Young Woong, EXO, TWICE, CL

RET Popularity Award (Aktor): Song Ji Hyo, Kim Seon Ho

U+ Idol Live Popularity Award (Singer): BTS, Lim Young Woong, IU

U+ Idol Live Popularity Award (Aktor): Jung Ho Yeon, Kim Seon Ho

AAA Best OST: Lim Young Woong (Love Always Run Away dari drama Young Lady and Gentleman)

AAA Best Producer: Woozi SEVENTEEN

AAA Best Creator: Brave Brothers

AAA Best Music Video: EVERGLOW

AAA Icon (Penyanyi): WOODZ (Cho Seung Youn)

AAA Icon (Actor): Ryu Kyung Soo

AAA Hot Trend (Penyanyi): Brave Girls, aespa

AAA Hot Trend (Aktor): Lee Jung Jae

AAA Best Emotive (Penyanyi): WJSN CHOCOME, Kwon Eun Bi

AAA Best Emotive (Aktor): Cha Eun Woo ASTRO, Moon Ga Young

AAA Asia Celebrity (Penyanyi): BamBam GOT7, THE BOYZ

AAA Asia Celebrity (Aktor): Yoo Ah In, Metawin Opas-iamkajorn

AAA Best Choice (Penyanyi): PENTAGON, MOMOLAND, Golden Child

AAA Best Choice (Actor): Lee Jun Young (U-KISSS), Joo Suk Tae

AAA Scene Stealer: Cha Ji Yeon

AAA Best Acting Award: Yuri SNSD, Sung Hoon

AAA Best Musician: Kang Daniel, ITZY, ASTRO, Wonho, THE BOYZ

AAA Best Actor: Park Joo Mi, Heo Sung Tae, Kim Joo Ryoung

AAA Fabulous (Penyanyi): SEVENTEEN

AAA Fabulous (Actor): Lee Jung Jae

AAA Best Achievement: NU’EST

AAA Best Artist (Penyanyi): BamBam, ENHYPEN, Brave Girls

AAA Best Artist (Actor): Jeon Yeo Been, Han So Hee

History of Songs Award: Sandaime J Soul Brothers from EXILE TRIBE.*

(SIS)

We want to say thanks to the author of this article for this amazing content

From BTS to Lee Jung Jae, Here’s the Complete List of Winners of the 2021 Asia Artist Awards: Okezone Celebrity

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638468032) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(59) "Jennifer Lopez’s secret to wear a sweater with jeans well" ["link"]=> string(90) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/jennifer-lopezs-secret-to-wear-a-sweater-with-jeans-well/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Sally Scully" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 17:19:29 +0000" ["category"]=> string(45) "CelebrityjeansJenniferLopezsSecretsweaterwear" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4825" ["description"]=> string(592) "Bauer-GriffinGetty Images When you are a star of the stature of Jennifer Lopez that she has to change a thousand times for her concerts between songs, hundreds of times for her movies between takes and several times in her day to day to be perfect on her dates, you know with your eyes closed which ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5933) "

Bauer-GriffinGetty Images

When you are a star of the stature of Jennifer Lopez that she has to change a thousand times for her concerts between songs, hundreds of times for her movies between takes and several times in her day to day to be perfect on her dates, you know with your eyes closed which clothes are worth investing in. You become an expert at getting the most out of yourself with less effort. That’s why we love to look at him jennifer lopez style, which always leaves us fashion tricks, even if it is in an oversight. The most international singer does not lose her rings. To move the merchandise of a truck with his partner Ben Affleck – with whom since they had a second chance he has been better than ever – he rolled up his sleeves and transported sacks like the most. Looking at your simple turtleneck sweater and jeans look We saw why her outfit suited her so well: Jennifer Lopez was not wearing a sweater but a body ribbed knit and roll neck.

With his knitted bodysuit Jennifer Lopez made sure of several things. First, not having to worry about whether or not your top was coming out of your jeans. Something really uncomfortable that if it can be avoided is appreciated. Then she knew she was going to be very warm. Finally I was certain that I was going to look stylish, since a body makes a second skin effect without wrinkles. On the face of it, it makes you look much slimmer. When he bent down to pick up a sack we saw his style trick better than ever. We could only thank serendipity for having discovered us his secret never confessed.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

At 52, Jennifer Lopez is in her prime, in full promotion of his latest film ‘Marry Me’. Wastes energy and can with everything. He keeps mesmerizing us in his party and party looks Red carpet. When we see her with daily outfits it amazes us with its keys. She is capable of making a basic knitwear -which many use as an undershirt-, a true ally of the dressing room.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from embed-name. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

Although we are used to using bodies in its finest version or in lurex in a party plan, a body Chunky turtleneck knit like Jennifer Lopez’s may be the smartest investment for our December looks.

A warm and appetizing garment that can accompany us in outfits casual and versatile. JLo takes her to his land with some pants flare 90s who are already about jeans common in your favorite casual looks.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

We would love to thank the author of this post for this incredible material

Jennifer Lopez’s secret to wear a sweater with jeans well

" } ["summary"]=> string(592) "Bauer-GriffinGetty Images When you are a star of the stature of Jennifer Lopez that she has to change a thousand times for her concerts between songs, hundreds of times for her movies between takes and several times in her day to day to be perfect on her dates, you know with your eyes closed which ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5933) "

Bauer-GriffinGetty Images

When you are a star of the stature of Jennifer Lopez that she has to change a thousand times for her concerts between songs, hundreds of times for her movies between takes and several times in her day to day to be perfect on her dates, you know with your eyes closed which clothes are worth investing in. You become an expert at getting the most out of yourself with less effort. That’s why we love to look at him jennifer lopez style, which always leaves us fashion tricks, even if it is in an oversight. The most international singer does not lose her rings. To move the merchandise of a truck with his partner Ben Affleck – with whom since they had a second chance he has been better than ever – he rolled up his sleeves and transported sacks like the most. Looking at your simple turtleneck sweater and jeans look We saw why her outfit suited her so well: Jennifer Lopez was not wearing a sweater but a body ribbed knit and roll neck.

With his knitted bodysuit Jennifer Lopez made sure of several things. First, not having to worry about whether or not your top was coming out of your jeans. Something really uncomfortable that if it can be avoided is appreciated. Then she knew she was going to be very warm. Finally I was certain that I was going to look stylish, since a body makes a second skin effect without wrinkles. On the face of it, it makes you look much slimmer. When he bent down to pick up a sack we saw his style trick better than ever. We could only thank serendipity for having discovered us his secret never confessed.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

At 52, Jennifer Lopez is in her prime, in full promotion of his latest film ‘Marry Me’. Wastes energy and can with everything. He keeps mesmerizing us in his party and party looks Red carpet. When we see her with daily outfits it amazes us with its keys. She is capable of making a basic knitwear -which many use as an undershirt-, a true ally of the dressing room.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from embed-name. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

Although we are used to using bodies in its finest version or in lurex in a party plan, a body Chunky turtleneck knit like Jennifer Lopez’s may be the smartest investment for our December looks.

A warm and appetizing garment that can accompany us in outfits casual and versatile. JLo takes her to his land with some pants flare 90s who are already about jeans common in your favorite casual looks.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

We would love to thank the author of this post for this incredible material

Jennifer Lopez’s secret to wear a sweater with jeans well

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638465569) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(56) "Skin care with Karin Björkegren Jones – Food Pharmacy" ["link"]=> string(85) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/skin-care-with-karin-bjorkegren-jones-food-pharmacy/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Paula Hooper" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 17:17:11 +0000" ["category"]=> string(50) "LifestyleBjörkegrencareFoodJonesKarinPharmacyskin" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4819" ["description"]=> string(625) "Food Pharmacy Store ABs integritetspolicy Food Pharmacy Store AB (“Food Pharmacy”) works to ensure that your privacy is protected when using our services. Food Pharmacy is responsible for the personal data you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). In this privacy policy, we inform you about why and in what ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6201) "

Food Pharmacy Store ABs integritetspolicy

Food Pharmacy Store AB (“Food Pharmacy”) works to ensure that your privacy is protected when using our services. Food Pharmacy is responsible for the personal data you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

In this privacy policy, we inform you about why and in what way we process personal data and how we use cookies. Here you can also read about what you as a registered person have for rights and where you can turn to with questions or comments related to Food Pharmacy’s personal data processing. The privacy policy was last updated in September 2019.

What kind of personal data do we collect?

Customer
We collect personal information that you send to us, e.g. when you place orders and contact our customer service. The personal information that you send to us can e.g. include contact information, date of birth and payment information. In addition, we may collect certain personal data from external sources, e.g. credit information and address updates. When we do customer surveys, all user information is anonymized. Our legal basis for this personal data processing is to be able to fulfill the agreement against you as a customer or to be able to fulfill obligations according to law. Personal data is stored for 3 years.

Newsletters and offers
Personal information is also collected when registering our newsletter. If you have bought an item from us before, we also process your contact information in order to be able to send out offers to you. Such personal data processing is based on our legitimate interest. If you have been reached by unwanted mailings from us, you have, in accordance with the GDPR and the Marketing Act, always the right to oppose further mailings. You do this by clicking on the link in the email itself or by contacting us at info@foodpharmacy.se.

Membership
If you are a member of Food Pharmacy, we process your contact information and the information you provide in your profile. This processing of your personal data is required for us to be able to fulfill our obligations under the agreement / terms of membership. Personal data is stored until membership ends.

How do we use your personal information?
For the following purposes:

Where is your personal information stored?
The data are stored within the European Economic Area (EEA).

What are your rights?
You have the right to request information about the personal information we have about you. If your information is incorrect, incomplete or irrelevant, you can request that it be corrected or deleted. However, we can not delete your data in cases where there is a statutory requirement for storage for e.g. accounting rules, or when there are other legal reasons why the data must be saved. You also have the right to contact Datainspektionen at datainspektionen@datainspektionen.se to submit a complaint.

Who has access to your personal information?
We never sell, exchange or pass on your personal information for marketing purposes to third parties outside of Food Pharmacy. Information passed on to third parties is only used to provide the above services to you, e.g. carriers in connection with the delivery of goods, media agencies for the distribution of newsletters and credit information or debt collection agencies for information checks to verify identity, credit or debt collection.

We protect your personal information
We have technical and organizational measures to protect your data from unauthorized access. We continuously adapt our security measures. Our payment agents process your card and personal data in accordance with the international security standard. You can read more about these standards on our suppliers’ websites – Klarna.se and Stripe.com.

Cookies
A cookie is a text file that is saved on your computer or mobile device and retrieved from it on later visits to our website. Food Pharmacy uses cookies to improve and simplify your visit. We do not use cookies to store personal information or to spread information to third parties. You can easily delete cookies from your computer or mobile device via the browser, or surf in anonymous mode.

We use cookies from third parties to collect statistics in aggregate form in analysis tools such as Google Analytics. The cookies used are both permanent and temporary cookies (session cookies). Permanent cookies are stored as files on your computer or mobile device for a maximum of 24 months. Temporary cookies are deleted when you close the browser.

To get more information about cookies and the Electronic Communications Act, you can visit the Swedish Post and Telecom Agency’s website.

Personal data manager
Food Pharmacy Store AB is responsible for the personal data that you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Ordinance (GDPR).

Food Pharmacy AB
Riddargatan 20
114 51 Stockholm
E-mail: info@foodpharmacy.se, jonna.andersson@foodpharmacy.se

We want to give thanks to the author of this write-up for this awesome content

Skin care with Karin Björkegren Jones – Food Pharmacy

" } ["summary"]=> string(625) "Food Pharmacy Store ABs integritetspolicy Food Pharmacy Store AB (“Food Pharmacy”) works to ensure that your privacy is protected when using our services. Food Pharmacy is responsible for the personal data you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). In this privacy policy, we inform you about why and in what ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(6201) "

Food Pharmacy Store ABs integritetspolicy

Food Pharmacy Store AB (“Food Pharmacy”) works to ensure that your privacy is protected when using our services. Food Pharmacy is responsible for the personal data you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

In this privacy policy, we inform you about why and in what way we process personal data and how we use cookies. Here you can also read about what you as a registered person have for rights and where you can turn to with questions or comments related to Food Pharmacy’s personal data processing. The privacy policy was last updated in September 2019.

What kind of personal data do we collect?

Customer
We collect personal information that you send to us, e.g. when you place orders and contact our customer service. The personal information that you send to us can e.g. include contact information, date of birth and payment information. In addition, we may collect certain personal data from external sources, e.g. credit information and address updates. When we do customer surveys, all user information is anonymized. Our legal basis for this personal data processing is to be able to fulfill the agreement against you as a customer or to be able to fulfill obligations according to law. Personal data is stored for 3 years.

Newsletters and offers
Personal information is also collected when registering our newsletter. If you have bought an item from us before, we also process your contact information in order to be able to send out offers to you. Such personal data processing is based on our legitimate interest. If you have been reached by unwanted mailings from us, you have, in accordance with the GDPR and the Marketing Act, always the right to oppose further mailings. You do this by clicking on the link in the email itself or by contacting us at info@foodpharmacy.se.

Membership
If you are a member of Food Pharmacy, we process your contact information and the information you provide in your profile. This processing of your personal data is required for us to be able to fulfill our obligations under the agreement / terms of membership. Personal data is stored until membership ends.

How do we use your personal information?
For the following purposes:

Where is your personal information stored?
The data are stored within the European Economic Area (EEA).

What are your rights?
You have the right to request information about the personal information we have about you. If your information is incorrect, incomplete or irrelevant, you can request that it be corrected or deleted. However, we can not delete your data in cases where there is a statutory requirement for storage for e.g. accounting rules, or when there are other legal reasons why the data must be saved. You also have the right to contact Datainspektionen at datainspektionen@datainspektionen.se to submit a complaint.

Who has access to your personal information?
We never sell, exchange or pass on your personal information for marketing purposes to third parties outside of Food Pharmacy. Information passed on to third parties is only used to provide the above services to you, e.g. carriers in connection with the delivery of goods, media agencies for the distribution of newsletters and credit information or debt collection agencies for information checks to verify identity, credit or debt collection.

We protect your personal information
We have technical and organizational measures to protect your data from unauthorized access. We continuously adapt our security measures. Our payment agents process your card and personal data in accordance with the international security standard. You can read more about these standards on our suppliers’ websites – Klarna.se and Stripe.com.

Cookies
A cookie is a text file that is saved on your computer or mobile device and retrieved from it on later visits to our website. Food Pharmacy uses cookies to improve and simplify your visit. We do not use cookies to store personal information or to spread information to third parties. You can easily delete cookies from your computer or mobile device via the browser, or surf in anonymous mode.

We use cookies from third parties to collect statistics in aggregate form in analysis tools such as Google Analytics. The cookies used are both permanent and temporary cookies (session cookies). Permanent cookies are stored as files on your computer or mobile device for a maximum of 24 months. Temporary cookies are deleted when you close the browser.

To get more information about cookies and the Electronic Communications Act, you can visit the Swedish Post and Telecom Agency’s website.

Personal data manager
Food Pharmacy Store AB is responsible for the personal data that you send to us in accordance with the Data Protection Ordinance (GDPR).

Food Pharmacy AB
Riddargatan 20
114 51 Stockholm
E-mail: info@foodpharmacy.se, jonna.andersson@foodpharmacy.se

We want to give thanks to the author of this write-up for this awesome content

Skin care with Karin Björkegren Jones – Food Pharmacy

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638465431) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(71) "Breakthrough tool to show how much exoskeletons reduce back injury risk" ["link"]=> string(105) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/breakthrough-tool-to-show-how-much-exoskeletons-reduce-back-injury-risk/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Tony Grantly" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 17:03:18 +0000" ["category"]=> string(62) "Health And Sciencebreakthroughexoskeletonsinjuryreducerisktool" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4814" ["description"]=> string(707) "Journal Reference: Karl E. Zelik, Cameron A. Nurse, Mark C. Schall, Richard F. Sesek, Matthew C. Marino, Sean Gallagher. An ergonomic assessment tool for evaluating the effect of back exoskeletons on injury risk. Applied Ergonomics, 2022; 99: 103619 DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2021.103619 The tool, called Exo-LiFFT, is an interactive calculator that will help companies looking for ways ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4930) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Karl E. Zelik, Cameron A. Nurse, Mark C. Schall, Richard F. Sesek, Matthew C. Marino, Sean Gallagher. An ergonomic assessment tool for evaluating the effect of back exoskeletons on injury risk. Applied Ergonomics, 2022; 99: 103619 DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2021.103619

The tool, called Exo-LiFFT, is an interactive calculator that will help companies looking for ways to overcome workforces struggling with musculoskeletal injuries, missed work, and accelerated retirement amongst skilled laborers.

The study’s lead author, Karl Zelik, associate professor of mechanical engineering, said this is a major leap forward to help bring relief to overburdened workers.

The study was published online this month in the Journal of Applied Ergonomics, and projected that exoskeletons have the potential to reduce workplace back injuries in material handling by 20% to 60%. This is a critical advancement because work-related injuries to overburdened workers are a major factor contributing to the current dynamics in the labor market.

“If we can identify the right places to deploy exoskeletons, then they can reduce injury risks as well as bodily discomfort, which impacts workers on the job and at home. Exoskeletons may also help improve worker recruitment and retention, which have been costly pain points for employers amidst the labor shortage,” said Zelik, who also is the Chief Scientific Officer at Nashville-based workforce wearable company HeroWear.

Zelik and Ph.D. student Cameron Nurse represented Vanderbilt on the six-person research team, which also featured industrial engineers from Auburn University and an ergonomist from HeroWear. Auburn previously developed foundational ergonomic risk assessment tools, while Vanderbilt and HeroWear have been deeply involved in exoskeleton research, design and translation, as well as the development of industry exoskeleton standards with members of the ASTM International standards committee, which includes companies like Boeing.

“We’ve been exploring exoskeletons at Boeing for the last few years, with encouraging results to date,” said Christopher Reid, Associate Technical Fellow of Human Factors and Ergonomics at Boeing. “It’s incredibly important and encouraging to see academia and industry coming together to develop practical risk assessment tools that can help identify and leverage the benefits of emerging safety technologies like exoskeletons.”

Overexertion is a primary source of lower back pain and injury, which accounts for 38.5% of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Exoskeletons are now being used daily in factories, warehouses, construction sites, and other workplaces around the world to relieve physical strain on overburdened workers.

“At Toyota, we have relied heavily on new ergonomic assessment tools to support our teams in identifying processes on our manufacturing lines that would benefit from shoulder exoskeletons being deployed as personal protective equipment,” said Aaron Sparks, safety project engineer at Toyota North America. “As we begin to investigate and deploy back exoskeletons, it’s incredibly exciting, and a major relief, to see similar tools being developed to support with the identification and deployment.”

Exo-LiFFT empowers safety professionals and researchers to quickly and easily assess the effect of exoskeletons on back injury risk without the need for costly and time-consuming experiments. This reduces biomechanical assessment time for back exoskeletons from months down to minutes, and provides an evidence-based way to estimate injury risk reduction.

“We have over one hundred facilities across the country where workers are lifting and moving products,” said David Brodie, ergonomist lead at Cargill. “New assessment tools like Exo-LiFFT will help us identify where the best opportunities are in our operations to support workers.”

The Exo-LiFFT tool can be used at lab.vanderbilt.edu/zelik/resources/exo-lifft/.

We want to thank the writer of this short article for this outstanding material

Breakthrough tool to show how much exoskeletons reduce back injury risk

" } ["summary"]=> string(707) "Journal Reference: Karl E. Zelik, Cameron A. Nurse, Mark C. Schall, Richard F. Sesek, Matthew C. Marino, Sean Gallagher. An ergonomic assessment tool for evaluating the effect of back exoskeletons on injury risk. Applied Ergonomics, 2022; 99: 103619 DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2021.103619 The tool, called Exo-LiFFT, is an interactive calculator that will help companies looking for ways ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4930) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Karl E. Zelik, Cameron A. Nurse, Mark C. Schall, Richard F. Sesek, Matthew C. Marino, Sean Gallagher. An ergonomic assessment tool for evaluating the effect of back exoskeletons on injury risk. Applied Ergonomics, 2022; 99: 103619 DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2021.103619

The tool, called Exo-LiFFT, is an interactive calculator that will help companies looking for ways to overcome workforces struggling with musculoskeletal injuries, missed work, and accelerated retirement amongst skilled laborers.

The study’s lead author, Karl Zelik, associate professor of mechanical engineering, said this is a major leap forward to help bring relief to overburdened workers.

The study was published online this month in the Journal of Applied Ergonomics, and projected that exoskeletons have the potential to reduce workplace back injuries in material handling by 20% to 60%. This is a critical advancement because work-related injuries to overburdened workers are a major factor contributing to the current dynamics in the labor market.

“If we can identify the right places to deploy exoskeletons, then they can reduce injury risks as well as bodily discomfort, which impacts workers on the job and at home. Exoskeletons may also help improve worker recruitment and retention, which have been costly pain points for employers amidst the labor shortage,” said Zelik, who also is the Chief Scientific Officer at Nashville-based workforce wearable company HeroWear.

Zelik and Ph.D. student Cameron Nurse represented Vanderbilt on the six-person research team, which also featured industrial engineers from Auburn University and an ergonomist from HeroWear. Auburn previously developed foundational ergonomic risk assessment tools, while Vanderbilt and HeroWear have been deeply involved in exoskeleton research, design and translation, as well as the development of industry exoskeleton standards with members of the ASTM International standards committee, which includes companies like Boeing.

“We’ve been exploring exoskeletons at Boeing for the last few years, with encouraging results to date,” said Christopher Reid, Associate Technical Fellow of Human Factors and Ergonomics at Boeing. “It’s incredibly important and encouraging to see academia and industry coming together to develop practical risk assessment tools that can help identify and leverage the benefits of emerging safety technologies like exoskeletons.”

Overexertion is a primary source of lower back pain and injury, which accounts for 38.5% of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Exoskeletons are now being used daily in factories, warehouses, construction sites, and other workplaces around the world to relieve physical strain on overburdened workers.

“At Toyota, we have relied heavily on new ergonomic assessment tools to support our teams in identifying processes on our manufacturing lines that would benefit from shoulder exoskeletons being deployed as personal protective equipment,” said Aaron Sparks, safety project engineer at Toyota North America. “As we begin to investigate and deploy back exoskeletons, it’s incredibly exciting, and a major relief, to see similar tools being developed to support with the identification and deployment.”

Exo-LiFFT empowers safety professionals and researchers to quickly and easily assess the effect of exoskeletons on back injury risk without the need for costly and time-consuming experiments. This reduces biomechanical assessment time for back exoskeletons from months down to minutes, and provides an evidence-based way to estimate injury risk reduction.

“We have over one hundred facilities across the country where workers are lifting and moving products,” said David Brodie, ergonomist lead at Cargill. “New assessment tools like Exo-LiFFT will help us identify where the best opportunities are in our operations to support workers.”

The Exo-LiFFT tool can be used at lab.vanderbilt.edu/zelik/resources/exo-lifft/.

We want to thank the writer of this short article for this outstanding material

Breakthrough tool to show how much exoskeletons reduce back injury risk

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638464598) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(53) "Breakthrough in surface-based groundwater measurement" ["link"]=> string(87) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/breakthrough-in-surface-based-groundwater-measurement/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Tony Grantly" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 15:46:06 +0000" ["category"]=> string(64) "Health And Sciencebreakthroughgroundwatermeasurementsurfacebased" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4809" ["description"]=> string(655) "Journal Reference: D. Grombacher, L. Liu, M. P. Griffiths, M. Ø. Vang, J. J. Larsen. Steady‐State Surface NMR for Mapping of Groundwater. Geophysical Research Letters, 2021; 48 (23) DOI: 10.1029/2021GL095381 The new technology sends very much cleaner signals than have so far been possible using NMR-based (nuclear magnetic resonance) measurements, and this enables the researchers ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4043) "

Journal Reference:

  1. D. Grombacher, L. Liu, M. P. Griffiths, M. Ø. Vang, J. J. Larsen. Steady‐State Surface NMR for Mapping of Groundwater. Geophysical Research Letters, 2021; 48 (23) DOI: 10.1029/2021GL095381

The new technology sends very much cleaner signals than have so far been possible using NMR-based (nuclear magnetic resonance) measurements, and this enables the researchers to make a detailed map of the hydrogeological and geological structure of the subsurface, even in inaccessible areas.

The research has just been published in the Geophysical Research Letters.

“Using this new technology, NMR measurements are now a cheap, fast and, above all, very accurate tool for mapping and characterising groundwater systems. There are problems with groundwater all over the world, and the really good news is that, using this tool, we can better map the groundwater and thereby take better care of it,” says Assistant Professor Denys Grombacher from the Department of Geoscience.

Groundwater is a critical source of freshwater for many billions of people, but climate change, pollution and over-exploitation are making it more difficult to find suitable areas as a groundwater source.

NMR measurements are the only technique available today that enable direct non-invasive measurements of the water content and pore properties of the soil.

NMR is short for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and in short it means that we influence the hydrogen atoms in water molecules in the subsurface using a human-made magnetic field on the surface.

Hydrogen atoms have a nuclear spin which, in principle, aligns with the magnetic field of the earth, either with or against the field — just like small magnets. A pulse from the artificially created magnetic field changes the spin direction of the hydrogen atoms, and when the pulse fades out, the atoms return to the direction they had before. This realignment emits an electromagnetic field that can be measured.

NMR measurements have a disadvantage, however, in that background noise from the electricity grid, for example, can interfere with the signals, and this can make it exceedingly difficult to measure the very weak electromagnetic field in the realignment.

Roughly speaking, the researchers are looking for a whisper-like voice among the audience at a Motörhead rock concert, and this is where the new technologies in the field of data transmission and modelling come into play.

“We can sort of direct the microphone towards the specific sound source we want to hear, and through a number of identical pulses almost ‘force’ a clear signal from the hydrogen atoms in the soil. The computer can piece together the signal we receive to an accurate reproduction of the original signal using data modelling,” says Associate Professor Jakob Juul Larsen from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

The research team sees the new technology as a breakthrough in groundwater modelling, and as a quick, stable, reliable and inexpensive alternative for mapping groundwater throughout the world.

The research is being headed by Associate Professor Jakob Juul Larsen from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and support is from a grant from the Independent Research Fund Denmark of DKK 5.9 million.

We would like to thank the author of this short article for this amazing material

Breakthrough in surface-based groundwater measurement

" } ["summary"]=> string(655) "Journal Reference: D. Grombacher, L. Liu, M. P. Griffiths, M. Ø. Vang, J. J. Larsen. Steady‐State Surface NMR for Mapping of Groundwater. Geophysical Research Letters, 2021; 48 (23) DOI: 10.1029/2021GL095381 The new technology sends very much cleaner signals than have so far been possible using NMR-based (nuclear magnetic resonance) measurements, and this enables the researchers ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4043) "

Journal Reference:

  1. D. Grombacher, L. Liu, M. P. Griffiths, M. Ø. Vang, J. J. Larsen. Steady‐State Surface NMR for Mapping of Groundwater. Geophysical Research Letters, 2021; 48 (23) DOI: 10.1029/2021GL095381

The new technology sends very much cleaner signals than have so far been possible using NMR-based (nuclear magnetic resonance) measurements, and this enables the researchers to make a detailed map of the hydrogeological and geological structure of the subsurface, even in inaccessible areas.

The research has just been published in the Geophysical Research Letters.

“Using this new technology, NMR measurements are now a cheap, fast and, above all, very accurate tool for mapping and characterising groundwater systems. There are problems with groundwater all over the world, and the really good news is that, using this tool, we can better map the groundwater and thereby take better care of it,” says Assistant Professor Denys Grombacher from the Department of Geoscience.

Groundwater is a critical source of freshwater for many billions of people, but climate change, pollution and over-exploitation are making it more difficult to find suitable areas as a groundwater source.

NMR measurements are the only technique available today that enable direct non-invasive measurements of the water content and pore properties of the soil.

NMR is short for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and in short it means that we influence the hydrogen atoms in water molecules in the subsurface using a human-made magnetic field on the surface.

Hydrogen atoms have a nuclear spin which, in principle, aligns with the magnetic field of the earth, either with or against the field — just like small magnets. A pulse from the artificially created magnetic field changes the spin direction of the hydrogen atoms, and when the pulse fades out, the atoms return to the direction they had before. This realignment emits an electromagnetic field that can be measured.

NMR measurements have a disadvantage, however, in that background noise from the electricity grid, for example, can interfere with the signals, and this can make it exceedingly difficult to measure the very weak electromagnetic field in the realignment.

Roughly speaking, the researchers are looking for a whisper-like voice among the audience at a Motörhead rock concert, and this is where the new technologies in the field of data transmission and modelling come into play.

“We can sort of direct the microphone towards the specific sound source we want to hear, and through a number of identical pulses almost ‘force’ a clear signal from the hydrogen atoms in the soil. The computer can piece together the signal we receive to an accurate reproduction of the original signal using data modelling,” says Associate Professor Jakob Juul Larsen from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

The research team sees the new technology as a breakthrough in groundwater modelling, and as a quick, stable, reliable and inexpensive alternative for mapping groundwater throughout the world.

The research is being headed by Associate Professor Jakob Juul Larsen from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and support is from a grant from the Independent Research Fund Denmark of DKK 5.9 million.

We would like to thank the author of this short article for this amazing material

Breakthrough in surface-based groundwater measurement

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638459966) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(46) "Deep learning dreams up new protein structures" ["link"]=> string(80) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/deep-learning-dreams-up-new-protein-structures/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Tony Grantly" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 14:29:17 +0000" ["category"]=> string(53) "Health And ScienceDeepdreamslearningproteinstructures" ["guid"]=> string(40) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org/?p=4804" ["description"]=> string(665) "Journal Reference: Ivan Anishchenko, Samuel J. Pellock, Tamuka M. Chidyausiku, Theresa A. Ramelot, Sergey Ovchinnikov, Jingzhou Hao, Khushboo Bafna, Christoffer Norn, Alex Kang, Asim K. Bera, Frank DiMaio, Lauren Carter, Cameron M. Chow, Gaetano T. Montelione, David Baker. De novo protein design by deep network hallucination. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04184-w Proteins, which are string-like molecules ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5116) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Ivan Anishchenko, Samuel J. Pellock, Tamuka M. Chidyausiku, Theresa A. Ramelot, Sergey Ovchinnikov, Jingzhou Hao, Khushboo Bafna, Christoffer Norn, Alex Kang, Asim K. Bera, Frank DiMaio, Lauren Carter, Cameron M. Chow, Gaetano T. Montelione, David Baker. De novo protein design by deep network hallucination. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04184-w

Proteins, which are string-like molecules found in every cell, spontaneously fold into intricate three-dimensional shapes. These folded shapes are key to nearly every biological process, including cellular development, DNA repair, and metabolism. But the complexity of protein shapes makes them difficult to study. Biochemists often use computers to predict how protein strings, or sequences, might fold. In recent years, deep learning has revolutionized the accuracy of this work.

“For this project, we made up completely random protein sequences and introduced mutations into them until our neural network predicted that they would fold into stable structures,” said co-lead author Ivan Anishchenko, He is an acting instructor of biochemisty at the University of Washington School of Medicine and a researcher in David Baker’s laboratory at the UW Medicine Institute for Protein Design.

“At no point did we guide the software toward a particular outcome,” Anishchenko said, ” These new proteins are just what a computer dreams up.”

In the future, the team believes it should be possible to steer the artificial intelligence so that it generates new proteins with useful features.

“We’d like to use deep learning to design proteins with function, including protein-based drugs, enzymes, you name it,” said co-lead author Sam Pellock, a postdoctoral scholar in the Baker lab.

The research team, which included scientists from UW Medicine, Harvard University, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), generated two thousand new protein sequences that were predicted to fold. Over 100 of these were produced in the laboratory and studied. Detailed analysis on three such proteins confirmed that the shapes predicted by the computer were indeed realized in the lab.

“Our NMR [nuclear magnetic resonance] studies, along with X-ray crystal structures determined by the University of Washington team, demonstrate the remarkable accuracy of protein designs created by the hallucination approach,” said co-author Theresa Ramelot, a senior research scientist at RPI in Troy, New York.

Gaetano Montelione, a co-author and professor of chemistry and chemical biology at RPI, noted. “The hallucination approach builds on observations we made together with the Baker lab revealing that protein structure prediction with deep learning can be quite accurate even for a single protein sequence with no natural relatives. The potential to hallucinate brand new proteins that bind particular biomolecules or form desired enzymatic active sites is very exciting.”

“This approach greatly simplifies protein design,” said senior author David Baker, a professor of biochemistry at the UW School of Medicine who received a 2021 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. “Before, to create a new protein with a particular shape, people first carefully studied related structures in nature to come up with a set of rules that were then applied in the design process. New sets of rules were needed for each new type of fold. Here, by using a deep-learning network that already captures general principles of protein structure, we eliminate the need for fold-specific rules and open up the possibility of focusing on just the functional parts of a protein directly.”

“Exploring how to best use this strategy for specific applications is now an active area of research, and this is where I expect the next breakthroughs,” said Baker.

Funding was provided by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy, Open Philanthropy, Eric and Wendy Schmidt by recommendation of the Schmidt Futures program, Audacious Project, Washington Research Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The authors also acknowledge computing resources from the University of Washington and [email protected] volunteers.

We wish to thank the author of this article for this awesome content

Deep learning dreams up new protein structures

" } ["summary"]=> string(665) "Journal Reference: Ivan Anishchenko, Samuel J. Pellock, Tamuka M. Chidyausiku, Theresa A. Ramelot, Sergey Ovchinnikov, Jingzhou Hao, Khushboo Bafna, Christoffer Norn, Alex Kang, Asim K. Bera, Frank DiMaio, Lauren Carter, Cameron M. Chow, Gaetano T. Montelione, David Baker. De novo protein design by deep network hallucination. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04184-w Proteins, which are string-like molecules ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5116) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Ivan Anishchenko, Samuel J. Pellock, Tamuka M. Chidyausiku, Theresa A. Ramelot, Sergey Ovchinnikov, Jingzhou Hao, Khushboo Bafna, Christoffer Norn, Alex Kang, Asim K. Bera, Frank DiMaio, Lauren Carter, Cameron M. Chow, Gaetano T. Montelione, David Baker. De novo protein design by deep network hallucination. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04184-w

Proteins, which are string-like molecules found in every cell, spontaneously fold into intricate three-dimensional shapes. These folded shapes are key to nearly every biological process, including cellular development, DNA repair, and metabolism. But the complexity of protein shapes makes them difficult to study. Biochemists often use computers to predict how protein strings, or sequences, might fold. In recent years, deep learning has revolutionized the accuracy of this work.

“For this project, we made up completely random protein sequences and introduced mutations into them until our neural network predicted that they would fold into stable structures,” said co-lead author Ivan Anishchenko, He is an acting instructor of biochemisty at the University of Washington School of Medicine and a researcher in David Baker’s laboratory at the UW Medicine Institute for Protein Design.

“At no point did we guide the software toward a particular outcome,” Anishchenko said, ” These new proteins are just what a computer dreams up.”

In the future, the team believes it should be possible to steer the artificial intelligence so that it generates new proteins with useful features.

“We’d like to use deep learning to design proteins with function, including protein-based drugs, enzymes, you name it,” said co-lead author Sam Pellock, a postdoctoral scholar in the Baker lab.

The research team, which included scientists from UW Medicine, Harvard University, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), generated two thousand new protein sequences that were predicted to fold. Over 100 of these were produced in the laboratory and studied. Detailed analysis on three such proteins confirmed that the shapes predicted by the computer were indeed realized in the lab.

“Our NMR [nuclear magnetic resonance] studies, along with X-ray crystal structures determined by the University of Washington team, demonstrate the remarkable accuracy of protein designs created by the hallucination approach,” said co-author Theresa Ramelot, a senior research scientist at RPI in Troy, New York.

Gaetano Montelione, a co-author and professor of chemistry and chemical biology at RPI, noted. “The hallucination approach builds on observations we made together with the Baker lab revealing that protein structure prediction with deep learning can be quite accurate even for a single protein sequence with no natural relatives. The potential to hallucinate brand new proteins that bind particular biomolecules or form desired enzymatic active sites is very exciting.”

“This approach greatly simplifies protein design,” said senior author David Baker, a professor of biochemistry at the UW School of Medicine who received a 2021 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. “Before, to create a new protein with a particular shape, people first carefully studied related structures in nature to come up with a set of rules that were then applied in the design process. New sets of rules were needed for each new type of fold. Here, by using a deep-learning network that already captures general principles of protein structure, we eliminate the need for fold-specific rules and open up the possibility of focusing on just the functional parts of a protein directly.”

“Exploring how to best use this strategy for specific applications is now an active area of research, and this is where I expect the next breakthroughs,” said Baker.

Funding was provided by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy, Open Philanthropy, Eric and Wendy Schmidt by recommendation of the Schmidt Futures program, Audacious Project, Washington Research Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The authors also acknowledge computing resources from the University of Washington and [email protected] volunteers.

We wish to thank the author of this article for this awesome content

Deep learning dreams up new protein structures

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1638455357) } } ["channel"]=> array(7) { ["title"]=> string(20) "Wikileaksisdemocracy" ["link"]=> string(32) "https://wikileaksisdemocracy.org" ["lastbuilddate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 19:37:01 +0000" ["language"]=> string(5) "en-US" ["sy"]=> array(2) { ["updateperiod"]=> string(9) " hourly " ["updatefrequency"]=> string(4) " 1 " } ["generator"]=> string(30) "https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2" ["tagline"]=> NULL } ["textinput"]=> array(0) { } ["image"]=> array(0) { } ["feed_type"]=> string(3) "RSS" ["feed_version"]=> string(3) "2.0" ["encoding"]=> string(5) "UTF-8" ["_source_encoding"]=> string(0) "" ["ERROR"]=> string(0) "" ["WARNING"]=> string(0) "" ["_CONTENT_CONSTRUCTS"]=> array(6) { [0]=> string(7) "content" [1]=> string(7) "summary" [2]=> string(4) "info" [3]=> string(5) "title" [4]=> string(7) "tagline" [5]=> string(9) "copyright" } ["_KNOWN_ENCODINGS"]=> array(3) { [0]=> string(5) "UTF-8" [1]=> string(8) "US-ASCII" [2]=> string(10) "ISO-8859-1" } ["stack"]=> array(0) { } ["inchannel"]=> bool(false) ["initem"]=> bool(false) ["incontent"]=> bool(false) ["intextinput"]=> bool(false) ["inimage"]=> bool(false) ["current_namespace"]=> bool(false) ["last_modified"]=> string(31) "Thu, 02 Dec 2021 19:37:01 GMT " ["etag"]=> string(41) ""bc2f49f2c97e3b694852e36dc7635b7c-gzip" " }