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Channel: World Sports News

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      ["title"]=>
      string(68) "Lewis Hamilton in need of a win at fast Monza track – The Athletic"
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      string(93) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/lewis-hamilton-in-need-of-a-win-at-fast-monza-track-the-athletic/"
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        string(11) "Susan Hally"
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The last two races on the Formula One calendar haven’t delivered much action, but perhaps Monza will. The F1 season marches on with the third race in three weeks with the Italian Grand Prix.

This is the second Italian race this season after the Emilia Romagna Grand Prix took place in Imola for the second race of the year. Last week’s Dutch Grand Prix lived up to driver expectations as a tough circuit to pass on, but Autodromo Nazionale Monza is a polar opposite track.

Monza has the highest average lap speed on the F1 calendar. It features a relatively wide track, especially for a circuit that’s been around for so long, and is loaded with straights, chicanes and high-speed corners. It should offer plenty of passing opportunities.

One thing that Monza has not been good for in recent years is qualifying sessions. Getting a tow from a car in front is essential to getting a good lap time and no one wants to be the car that doesn’t get that tow. The result has been that everyone waits to go out as long as possible. Infamously in 2019 a few cars didn’t even get lap times in during Q3 while the drivers got stuck in a game of chicken and waited too long.

With that in mind it’s a good thing that sprint qualifying makes its return this weekend. If ever there was a track that needed an altered qualifying set up, it’s this one. Qualifying takes place on Friday to set the order for Saturday’s sprint qualifying, which is a short race that rewards the top finishers with a few points and sets the start order for Sunday’s race. There will probably still be a somewhat silly qualifying session, but the sprint race should make up for the nonsense we could see on Friday.

Sprint qualifying debuted at the British Grand Prix and is set for one more trial run after this weekend. In Britain, Lewis Hamilton was first in qualifying, but Verstappen passed him early in sprint qualifying to take pole. Hamilton went on to win the race.

The Italian Grand Prix is also famous for the crowds and the post-race podium. The Ferrari fans are expected to be out in full force. After the Dutch fans went crazy for Max Verstappen’s win last week, we now get the famous Italian tifosi for this race.

The fast track should give Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes an edge. The Mercedes is supposed to be faster on straights while the Red Bull has an advantage in corners. It’s been a while since a track has fully tested the straight line speed of these two cars. If Hamilton doesn’t win here, it will be a huge blow to his Drivers’ Championship hopes. He enters as the betting favorite and is the pick to win.

All odds from BetMGM. Want a free The Athletic subscription? Sign up for BetMGM, Bet $10, win $150 in free bets and a free three-month subscription (or renewal) to The Athletic.

Italian Grand Prix odds

Qualifying Sprint qualifying Race

Lewis Hamilton

+115

1-1

1-1

Max Verstappen

5-4

11-10

6-5

Valtteri Bottas

5-1

10-1

12-1

Sergio Perez

20-1

20-1

16-1

Lando Norris

20-1

33-1

33-1

Charles Leclerc

25-1

33-1

33-1

Pierre Gasly

50-1

50-1

50-1

Carlos Sainz Jr.

33-1

66-1

66-1

Daniel Ricciardo

80-1

80-1

80-1

Note that a number of drivers have shorter odds for qualifying than for sprint qualifying or the race. That’s the oddsmakers giving themselves an out in case a random car gets a tow advantage against the rest of the field or one of the fast cars gets caught waiting too long during qualifying. Weird things have happened during qualifying sessions at Monza. The sprint race gives the favorites another chance to move up the field in that case and it is also possible to come from behind here during a race.

Drivers’ and Constructors’ Championship races

Verstappen’s win in The Netherlands pushed him back in front of Hamilton by three points. However, Red Bull driver Sergio Perez got held up in qualifying and started 16th before salvaging eighth place in the race. Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas both finished on the podium, meaning Mercedes gained points on Red Bull even though Hamilton lost his lead to Verstappen.

There hasn’t been a champion driver that didn’t come from the winning constructor since 2008. There’s a long way to go, but it’s looking more likely.

Verstappen is -155 to Hamilton’s +110 in the Drivers’ Championship. Mercedes is -135 with Red Bull at even money in the Constructors’ Championship.

If Verstappen outscores Hamilton in Monza, look for the odds to take a sharp turn in the Dutchman’s direction.

(Photo: Miguel Medina / AFP via Getty Images; The Athletic may receive an affiliate commission if you open an account with BetMGM through links contained in the above article.)

Get all-access to exclusive stories.

Subscribe to The Athletic for ad-free, in-depth coverage of your favorite players, teams, leagues and clubs. Try a week on us.

START FREE TRIAL

.

" } ["summary"]=> string(94) "The last two races on the Formula One calendar haven’t delivered much action, but perhaps..." ["atom_content"]=> string(9343) "

The last two races on the Formula One calendar haven’t delivered much action, but perhaps Monza will. The F1 season marches on with the third race in three weeks with the Italian Grand Prix.

This is the second Italian race this season after the Emilia Romagna Grand Prix took place in Imola for the second race of the year. Last week’s Dutch Grand Prix lived up to driver expectations as a tough circuit to pass on, but Autodromo Nazionale Monza is a polar opposite track.

Monza has the highest average lap speed on the F1 calendar. It features a relatively wide track, especially for a circuit that’s been around for so long, and is loaded with straights, chicanes and high-speed corners. It should offer plenty of passing opportunities.

One thing that Monza has not been good for in recent years is qualifying sessions. Getting a tow from a car in front is essential to getting a good lap time and no one wants to be the car that doesn’t get that tow. The result has been that everyone waits to go out as long as possible. Infamously in 2019 a few cars didn’t even get lap times in during Q3 while the drivers got stuck in a game of chicken and waited too long.

With that in mind it’s a good thing that sprint qualifying makes its return this weekend. If ever there was a track that needed an altered qualifying set up, it’s this one. Qualifying takes place on Friday to set the order for Saturday’s sprint qualifying, which is a short race that rewards the top finishers with a few points and sets the start order for Sunday’s race. There will probably still be a somewhat silly qualifying session, but the sprint race should make up for the nonsense we could see on Friday.

Sprint qualifying debuted at the British Grand Prix and is set for one more trial run after this weekend. In Britain, Lewis Hamilton was first in qualifying, but Verstappen passed him early in sprint qualifying to take pole. Hamilton went on to win the race.

The Italian Grand Prix is also famous for the crowds and the post-race podium. The Ferrari fans are expected to be out in full force. After the Dutch fans went crazy for Max Verstappen’s win last week, we now get the famous Italian tifosi for this race.

The fast track should give Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes an edge. The Mercedes is supposed to be faster on straights while the Red Bull has an advantage in corners. It’s been a while since a track has fully tested the straight line speed of these two cars. If Hamilton doesn’t win here, it will be a huge blow to his Drivers’ Championship hopes. He enters as the betting favorite and is the pick to win.

All odds from BetMGM. Want a free The Athletic subscription? Sign up for BetMGM, Bet $10, win $150 in free bets and a free three-month subscription (or renewal) to The Athletic.

Italian Grand Prix odds

Qualifying Sprint qualifying Race

Lewis Hamilton

+115

1-1

1-1

Max Verstappen

5-4

11-10

6-5

Valtteri Bottas

5-1

10-1

12-1

Sergio Perez

20-1

20-1

16-1

Lando Norris

20-1

33-1

33-1

Charles Leclerc

25-1

33-1

33-1

Pierre Gasly

50-1

50-1

50-1

Carlos Sainz Jr.

33-1

66-1

66-1

Daniel Ricciardo

80-1

80-1

80-1

Note that a number of drivers have shorter odds for qualifying than for sprint qualifying or the race. That’s the oddsmakers giving themselves an out in case a random car gets a tow advantage against the rest of the field or one of the fast cars gets caught waiting too long during qualifying. Weird things have happened during qualifying sessions at Monza. The sprint race gives the favorites another chance to move up the field in that case and it is also possible to come from behind here during a race.

Drivers’ and Constructors’ Championship races

Verstappen’s win in The Netherlands pushed him back in front of Hamilton by three points. However, Red Bull driver Sergio Perez got held up in qualifying and started 16th before salvaging eighth place in the race. Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas both finished on the podium, meaning Mercedes gained points on Red Bull even though Hamilton lost his lead to Verstappen.

There hasn’t been a champion driver that didn’t come from the winning constructor since 2008. There’s a long way to go, but it’s looking more likely.

Verstappen is -155 to Hamilton’s +110 in the Drivers’ Championship. Mercedes is -135 with Red Bull at even money in the Constructors’ Championship.

If Verstappen outscores Hamilton in Monza, look for the odds to take a sharp turn in the Dutchman’s direction.

(Photo: Miguel Medina / AFP via Getty Images; The Athletic may receive an affiliate commission if you open an account with BetMGM through links contained in the above article.)

Get all-access to exclusive stories.

Subscribe to The Athletic for ad-free, in-depth coverage of your favorite players, teams, leagues and clubs. Try a week on us.

START FREE TRIAL

.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631246088) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(80) "These fridge-free COVID-19 vaccines are grown in plants and bacteria – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(105) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/these-fridge-free-covid-19-vaccines-are-grown-in-plants-and-bacteria-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(6) "skunky" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 03:51:16 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(105) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/these-fridge-free-covid-19-vaccines-are-grown-in-plants-and-bacteria-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(119) "Journal Reference: Oscar A. Ortega-Rivera, Matthew D. Shin, Angela Chen, Veronique Beiss, Miguel A. Moreno-Gonzalez,..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(9741) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Oscar A. Ortega-Rivera, Matthew D. Shin, Angela Chen, Veronique Beiss, Miguel A. Moreno-Gonzalez, Miguel A. Lopez-Ramirez, Maria Reynoso, Hong Wang, Brett L. Hurst, Joseph Wang, Jonathan K. Pokorski, Nicole F. Steinmetz. Trivalent Subunit Vaccine Candidates for COVID-19 and Their Delivery Devices. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2021; DOI: 10.1021/jacs.1c06600

The new fridge-free COVID-19 vaccines are still in the early stage of development. In mice, the vaccine candidates triggered high production of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. If they prove to be safe and effective in people, the vaccines could be a big game changer for global distribution efforts, including those in rural areas or resource-poor communities.

“What’s exciting about our vaccine technology is that is thermally stable, so it could easily reach places where setting up ultra-low temperature freezers, or having trucks drive around with these freezers, is not going to be possible,” said Nicole Steinmetz, a professor of nanoengineering and the director of the Center for Nano-ImmunoEngineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering.

The vaccines are detailed in a paper published Sept. 7 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The researchers created two COVID-19 vaccine candidates. One is made from a plant virus, called cowpea mosaic virus. The other is made from a bacterial virus, or bacteriophage, called Q beta.

Both vaccines were made using similar recipes. The researchers used cowpea plants and E. coli bacteria to grow millions of copies of the plant virus and bacteriophage, respectively, in the form of ball-shaped nanoparticles. The researchers harvested these nanoparticles and then attached a small piece of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein to the surface. The finished products look like an infectious virus so the immune system can recognize them, but they are not infectious in animals and humans. The small piece of the spike protein attached to the surface is what stimulates the body to generate an immune response against the coronavirus.

The researchers note several advantages of using plant viruses and bacteriophages to make their vaccines. For one, they can be easy and inexpensive to produce at large scales. “Growing plants is relatively easy and involves infrastructure that’s not too sophisticated,” said Steinmetz. “And fermentation using bacteria is already an established process in the biopharmaceutical industry.”

Another big advantage is that the plant virus and bacteriophage nanoparticles are extremely stable at high temperatures. As a result, the vaccines can be stored and shipped without needing to be kept cold. They also can be put through fabrication processes that use heat. The team is using such processes to package their vaccines into polymer implants and microneedle patches. These processes involve mixing the vaccine candidates with polymers and melting them together in an oven at temperatures close to 100 degrees Celsius. Being able to directly mix the plant virus and bacteriophage nanoparticles with the polymers from the start makes it easy and straightforward to create vaccine implants and patches.

The goal is to give people more options for getting a COVID-19 vaccine and making it more accessible. The implants, which are injected underneath the skin and slowly release vaccine over the course of a month, would only need to be administered once. And the microneedle patches, which can be worn on the arm without pain or discomfort, would allow people to self-administer the vaccine.

“Imagine if vaccine patches could be sent to the mailboxes of our most vulnerable people, rather than having them leave their homes and risk exposure,” said Jon Pokorski, a professor of nanoengineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, whose team developed the technology to make the implants and microneedle patches.

“If clinics could offer a one-dose implant to those who would have a really hard time making it out for their second shot, that would offer protection for more of the population and we could have a better chance at stemming transmission,” added Pokorski, who is also a founding faculty member of the university’s Institute for Materials Discovery and Design.

In tests, the team’s COVID-19 vaccine candidates were administered to mice either via implants, microneedle patches, or as a series of two shots. All three methods produced high levels of neutralizing antibodies in the blood against SARS-CoV-2.

Potential pan-coronavirus vaccine

These same antibodies also neutralized against the SARS virus, the researchers found.

It all comes down to the piece of the coronavirus spike protein that is attached to the surface of the nanoparticles. One of these pieces that Steinmetz’s team chose, called an epitope, is almost identical between SARS-CoV-2 and the original SARS virus.

“The fact that neutralization is so profound with an epitope that’s so well conserved among another deadly coronavirus is remarkable,” said co-author Matthew Shin, a nanoengineering Ph.D. student in Steinmetz’s lab. “This gives us hope for a potential pan-coronavirus vaccine that could offer protection against future pandemics.”

Another advantage of this particular epitope is that it is not affected by any of the SARS-CoV-2 mutations that have so far been reported. That’s because this epitope comes from a region of the spike protein that does not directly bind to cells. This is different from the epitopes in the currently administered COVID-19 vaccines, which come from the spike protein’s binding region. This is a region where a lot of the mutations have occurred. And some of these mutations have made the virus more contagious.

Epitopes from a nonbinding region are less likely to undergo these mutations, explained Oscar Ortega-Rivera, a postdoctoral researcher in Steinmetz’s lab and the study’s first author. “Based on our sequence analyses, the epitope that we chose is highly conserved amongst the SARS-CoV-2 variants.”

This means that the new COVID-19 vaccines could potentially be effective against the variants of concern, said Ortega-Rivera, and tests are currently underway to see what effect they have against the Delta variant, for example.

Plug and play vaccine

Another thing that gets Steinmetz really excited about this vaccine technology is the versatility it offers to make new vaccines. “Even if this technology does not make an impact for COVID-19, it can be quickly adapted for the next threat, the next virus X,” said Steinmetz.

Making these vaccines, she says, is “plug and play:” grow plant virus or bacteriophage nanoparticles from plants or bacteria, respectively, then attach a piece of the target virus, pathogen, or biomarker to the surface.

“We use the same nanoparticles, the same polymers, the same equipment, and the same chemistry to put everything together. The only variable really is the antigen that we stick to the surface,” said Steinmetz.

The resulting vaccines do not need to be kept cold. They can be packaged into implants or microneedle patches. Or, they can be directly administered in the traditional way via shots.

Steinmetz and Pokorski’s labs have used this recipe in previous studies to make vaccine candidates for diseases like HPV and cholesterol. And now they’ve shown that it works for making COVID-19 vaccine candidates as well.

Next steps

The vaccines still have a long way to go before they make it into clinical trials. Moving forward, the team will test if the vaccines protect against infection from COVID-19, as well as its variants and other deadly coronaviruses, in vivo.

Paper: “Trivalent subunit vaccine candidates for COVID-19 and their delivery devices.” Co-authors include Angela Chen, Veronique Beiss, Miguel A. Moreno-Gonzalez, Miguel A. Lopez-Ramirez, Maria Reynoso and Joseph Wang, UC San Diego; Hong Wangand Brett L. Hurst,Utah State University.

This work was funded in part by a National Science Foundation both through a RAPID grant (CMMI-2027668) and through the UC San Diego Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC, grant DMR-2011924).

Disclosure: Nicole Steinmetz and Jon Pokorski are co-founders of and have a financial interest in Mosaic ImmunoEngineering Inc. All other authors declare no competing interests.

These fridge-free COVID-19 vaccines are grown in plants and bacteria

" } ["summary"]=> string(119) "Journal Reference: Oscar A. Ortega-Rivera, Matthew D. Shin, Angela Chen, Veronique Beiss, Miguel A. Moreno-Gonzalez,..." ["atom_content"]=> string(9741) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Oscar A. Ortega-Rivera, Matthew D. Shin, Angela Chen, Veronique Beiss, Miguel A. Moreno-Gonzalez, Miguel A. Lopez-Ramirez, Maria Reynoso, Hong Wang, Brett L. Hurst, Joseph Wang, Jonathan K. Pokorski, Nicole F. Steinmetz. Trivalent Subunit Vaccine Candidates for COVID-19 and Their Delivery Devices. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2021; DOI: 10.1021/jacs.1c06600

The new fridge-free COVID-19 vaccines are still in the early stage of development. In mice, the vaccine candidates triggered high production of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. If they prove to be safe and effective in people, the vaccines could be a big game changer for global distribution efforts, including those in rural areas or resource-poor communities.

“What’s exciting about our vaccine technology is that is thermally stable, so it could easily reach places where setting up ultra-low temperature freezers, or having trucks drive around with these freezers, is not going to be possible,” said Nicole Steinmetz, a professor of nanoengineering and the director of the Center for Nano-ImmunoEngineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering.

The vaccines are detailed in a paper published Sept. 7 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The researchers created two COVID-19 vaccine candidates. One is made from a plant virus, called cowpea mosaic virus. The other is made from a bacterial virus, or bacteriophage, called Q beta.

Both vaccines were made using similar recipes. The researchers used cowpea plants and E. coli bacteria to grow millions of copies of the plant virus and bacteriophage, respectively, in the form of ball-shaped nanoparticles. The researchers harvested these nanoparticles and then attached a small piece of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein to the surface. The finished products look like an infectious virus so the immune system can recognize them, but they are not infectious in animals and humans. The small piece of the spike protein attached to the surface is what stimulates the body to generate an immune response against the coronavirus.

The researchers note several advantages of using plant viruses and bacteriophages to make their vaccines. For one, they can be easy and inexpensive to produce at large scales. “Growing plants is relatively easy and involves infrastructure that’s not too sophisticated,” said Steinmetz. “And fermentation using bacteria is already an established process in the biopharmaceutical industry.”

Another big advantage is that the plant virus and bacteriophage nanoparticles are extremely stable at high temperatures. As a result, the vaccines can be stored and shipped without needing to be kept cold. They also can be put through fabrication processes that use heat. The team is using such processes to package their vaccines into polymer implants and microneedle patches. These processes involve mixing the vaccine candidates with polymers and melting them together in an oven at temperatures close to 100 degrees Celsius. Being able to directly mix the plant virus and bacteriophage nanoparticles with the polymers from the start makes it easy and straightforward to create vaccine implants and patches.

The goal is to give people more options for getting a COVID-19 vaccine and making it more accessible. The implants, which are injected underneath the skin and slowly release vaccine over the course of a month, would only need to be administered once. And the microneedle patches, which can be worn on the arm without pain or discomfort, would allow people to self-administer the vaccine.

“Imagine if vaccine patches could be sent to the mailboxes of our most vulnerable people, rather than having them leave their homes and risk exposure,” said Jon Pokorski, a professor of nanoengineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, whose team developed the technology to make the implants and microneedle patches.

“If clinics could offer a one-dose implant to those who would have a really hard time making it out for their second shot, that would offer protection for more of the population and we could have a better chance at stemming transmission,” added Pokorski, who is also a founding faculty member of the university’s Institute for Materials Discovery and Design.

In tests, the team’s COVID-19 vaccine candidates were administered to mice either via implants, microneedle patches, or as a series of two shots. All three methods produced high levels of neutralizing antibodies in the blood against SARS-CoV-2.

Potential pan-coronavirus vaccine

These same antibodies also neutralized against the SARS virus, the researchers found.

It all comes down to the piece of the coronavirus spike protein that is attached to the surface of the nanoparticles. One of these pieces that Steinmetz’s team chose, called an epitope, is almost identical between SARS-CoV-2 and the original SARS virus.

“The fact that neutralization is so profound with an epitope that’s so well conserved among another deadly coronavirus is remarkable,” said co-author Matthew Shin, a nanoengineering Ph.D. student in Steinmetz’s lab. “This gives us hope for a potential pan-coronavirus vaccine that could offer protection against future pandemics.”

Another advantage of this particular epitope is that it is not affected by any of the SARS-CoV-2 mutations that have so far been reported. That’s because this epitope comes from a region of the spike protein that does not directly bind to cells. This is different from the epitopes in the currently administered COVID-19 vaccines, which come from the spike protein’s binding region. This is a region where a lot of the mutations have occurred. And some of these mutations have made the virus more contagious.

Epitopes from a nonbinding region are less likely to undergo these mutations, explained Oscar Ortega-Rivera, a postdoctoral researcher in Steinmetz’s lab and the study’s first author. “Based on our sequence analyses, the epitope that we chose is highly conserved amongst the SARS-CoV-2 variants.”

This means that the new COVID-19 vaccines could potentially be effective against the variants of concern, said Ortega-Rivera, and tests are currently underway to see what effect they have against the Delta variant, for example.

Plug and play vaccine

Another thing that gets Steinmetz really excited about this vaccine technology is the versatility it offers to make new vaccines. “Even if this technology does not make an impact for COVID-19, it can be quickly adapted for the next threat, the next virus X,” said Steinmetz.

Making these vaccines, she says, is “plug and play:” grow plant virus or bacteriophage nanoparticles from plants or bacteria, respectively, then attach a piece of the target virus, pathogen, or biomarker to the surface.

“We use the same nanoparticles, the same polymers, the same equipment, and the same chemistry to put everything together. The only variable really is the antigen that we stick to the surface,” said Steinmetz.

The resulting vaccines do not need to be kept cold. They can be packaged into implants or microneedle patches. Or, they can be directly administered in the traditional way via shots.

Steinmetz and Pokorski’s labs have used this recipe in previous studies to make vaccine candidates for diseases like HPV and cholesterol. And now they’ve shown that it works for making COVID-19 vaccine candidates as well.

Next steps

The vaccines still have a long way to go before they make it into clinical trials. Moving forward, the team will test if the vaccines protect against infection from COVID-19, as well as its variants and other deadly coronaviruses, in vivo.

Paper: “Trivalent subunit vaccine candidates for COVID-19 and their delivery devices.” Co-authors include Angela Chen, Veronique Beiss, Miguel A. Moreno-Gonzalez, Miguel A. Lopez-Ramirez, Maria Reynoso and Joseph Wang, UC San Diego; Hong Wangand Brett L. Hurst,Utah State University.

This work was funded in part by a National Science Foundation both through a RAPID grant (CMMI-2027668) and through the UC San Diego Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC, grant DMR-2011924).

Disclosure: Nicole Steinmetz and Jon Pokorski are co-founders of and have a financial interest in Mosaic ImmunoEngineering Inc. All other authors declare no competing interests.

These fridge-free COVID-19 vaccines are grown in plants and bacteria

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631245876) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(79) "Golf changed his life. Now, he’s using the game to better the lives of others" ["link"]=> string(103) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/golf-changed-his-life-now-hes-using-the-game-to-better-the-lives-of-others/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 02:53:33 +0000" ["category"]=> string(31) "NewschangedGameGolfheslifelives" ["guid"]=> string(103) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/golf-changed-his-life-now-hes-using-the-game-to-better-the-lives-of-others/" ["description"]=> string(88) "By: Josh Sens September 9, 2021 Preston Pinkney working with a group of young players..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(10143) "

Preston Pinkney working with a group of young players in East Bay.

When Preston Pinkney says that golf can change a life, he speaks from experience.

The first life he saw the game change was his own.

It happened a little more than 20 years ago, when Pinkney was a young man at a juncture, faced with several paths that looked like probable dead ends.

In the rough-edged neighborhood where he was raised, in Richmond, Calif., just east of San Francisco, Pinkney held a world view shared by many of his peers.

dryvebox

How this ‘driving range on wheels’ is aiming to make golf more accessible

By:

Josh Sens



“If you were going to really make it, the thinking was that you had to be a rapper or an athlete,” he says. “The other option was to start dealing dope.”

Not that Pinkney lacked for guidance and support. A former high school mentor warned him of the pitfalls before him and offered advice on how to avoid them. His mom kept on him to land a steady gig, something more consistent than the bootstrapping music studio he’d founded.

But all of that was easier said than done.

It was right around that time that a job fell into his lap. Through a longtime golfer he’d met through music, Pinkney was offered a position as a shuttle driver for the Ace Foundation, an Oakland-based nonprofit aimed at opening opportunities for kids through golf.

From far right: Preston with son Preston Jr., daughter Nia and wife JoVannie at a recent African American Tour Quest event.

From his seat at the wheel, ferrying young passengers to local public courses and practice ranges, Pinkney gained an outlook through a different lens. Everything about the game seemed new and welcome. The challenge. The greenery. The codes of conduct. Pinkney’s sense of himself began to shift as well. The kids looked up to him. Regarded as a role model, he made it a priority to act the part.

Another crystalizing moment came in 2001, when Pinkney led an Ace Foundation outing to Monterey and the AT&T Championship at Pebble Beach. Gawking at the grand houses on 17-Mile Drive, taking in the coastal vistas and the roars of the crowds tracking Tiger Woods, Pinkney saw a future he’d never envisioned.

“I thought to myself, ‘All these possibilities — this is what golf is about,’” he says. “I started imagining doing things I never would have even dreamed about before.”

As his own game improved, Pinkney rose through the Ace ranks from driver to instructor to program coordinator. Sociable by nature, he built a Rolodex and worked his contacts, growing enrollment, raising funds. Fast-forward to the present. The Ace Kids Golf Foundation, as it is called today, is a vibrant force in East Bay junior golf, with year-round offerings for youngsters ages 5 to 18. Just before the pandemic, nearly 1,000 kids took part annually in Ace programs, a number that fell slightly during lockdowns, but which has now risen close to what it was.

I thought to myself, ‘All these possibilities — this is what golf is about.’ I started imagining doing things I never would have even dreamed about before.

preston pinkney

In everything Ace does, Pinkney is its lodestar, a guiding light.

“He’s got such dedication and such amazing people skills, he’s become a truly powerful voice within the community and for the community,” says Tony Canedo, a PGA-certified teaching professional who serves as Ace’s lead instructor. “We have all these ideas, all of these ambitions for how we can help the kids, and finding the resources to accomplish those things isn’t easy. Somehow, when we need something, Preston always seems to find a way to get things done.”

Last year, Pinkney tasked himself with doing even more. For all that Ace provided, Pinkney knew the program had built-in limits. After 18, its youngsters aged out. What about the kids who wanted to keep at it, who hoped to play competitively in college or beyond, or to make a living elsewhere in the game? Such ambitions called for talent and motivation but also money, training and other backing.

In early 2020, with his wife, JaVonnie, Pinkney founded African American Tour Quest (AATQ). As its name suggests, the organization strives to promote diversity in the game by supporting young Black golfers in their goals, whether it’s to turn pro, teach, run tournaments or assume some other post in the industry. Though AATQ has just begun to gain its footing, it already has a handful of players in its stable, providing them with access to sports psychologist, trainers, practice facilities and more.

Among those golfers is Ed Hackett, 23, who played his freshman year at Alabama State, earning Southwestern Athletic Conference co-MVP honors, and who now stars at Cal State Monterey Bay. Another is Adrian Davis, only 19 but already seasoned on the California amateur circuit. Like Hackett, he dreams of turning pro.

From left: AATQ participant Tre Craig; AATQ director of player development Jeffrey “JC” Callaway; and Tour pro Joseph Bramlett.

Davis, who came up through the Ace program, is also now an Ace instructor, teaching youngsters the etiquette and swing fundamentals that he learned in the same classes when he was their age.

The Ace program is based out of Lake Chabot Golf Course, a laidback Oakland muni where Pinkney keeps an office. In his minimal spare time, he serves on the board of the Northern California Golf Association, which recently donated a simulator to the Ace program; Pinkney intends to make the machine a centerpiece of a high-tech teaching facility he’s trying to build at Lake Chabot, as a complement to the low-tech driving range his Ace kids use today.

Meanwhile, there is always other work to do. Among his many duties, Pinkney busies himself with outreach efforts to potential students and benefactors alike. The NBA star Steph Curry has given generously to both ACE and AATQ. Recently, Robert Baker, the noted golf coach known for his work with Ernie Els, donated 1,200 junior training sets, which Pinkney plans to use in golf development programs in public schools.

Through Ace, Pinkney says, his goal in the next three to five years is to make sure that every child in Oakland gets to touch a golf club.

Make it a simple introduction. You never know what might change from there.

generic profile image

Golf.com

A golf, food and travel writer, Josh Sens has been a GOLF Magazine contributor since 2004 and now contributes across all of GOLF’s platforms. His work has been anthologized in The Best American Sportswriting. He is also the co-author, with Sammy Hagar, of Are We Having Any Fun Yet: the Cooking and Partying Handbook.

" } ["summary"]=> string(88) "By: Josh Sens September 9, 2021 Preston Pinkney working with a group of young players..." ["atom_content"]=> string(10143) "

Preston Pinkney working with a group of young players in East Bay.

When Preston Pinkney says that golf can change a life, he speaks from experience.

The first life he saw the game change was his own.

It happened a little more than 20 years ago, when Pinkney was a young man at a juncture, faced with several paths that looked like probable dead ends.

In the rough-edged neighborhood where he was raised, in Richmond, Calif., just east of San Francisco, Pinkney held a world view shared by many of his peers.

dryvebox

How this ‘driving range on wheels’ is aiming to make golf more accessible

By:

Josh Sens



“If you were going to really make it, the thinking was that you had to be a rapper or an athlete,” he says. “The other option was to start dealing dope.”

Not that Pinkney lacked for guidance and support. A former high school mentor warned him of the pitfalls before him and offered advice on how to avoid them. His mom kept on him to land a steady gig, something more consistent than the bootstrapping music studio he’d founded.

But all of that was easier said than done.

It was right around that time that a job fell into his lap. Through a longtime golfer he’d met through music, Pinkney was offered a position as a shuttle driver for the Ace Foundation, an Oakland-based nonprofit aimed at opening opportunities for kids through golf.

From far right: Preston with son Preston Jr., daughter Nia and wife JoVannie at a recent African American Tour Quest event.

From his seat at the wheel, ferrying young passengers to local public courses and practice ranges, Pinkney gained an outlook through a different lens. Everything about the game seemed new and welcome. The challenge. The greenery. The codes of conduct. Pinkney’s sense of himself began to shift as well. The kids looked up to him. Regarded as a role model, he made it a priority to act the part.

Another crystalizing moment came in 2001, when Pinkney led an Ace Foundation outing to Monterey and the AT&T Championship at Pebble Beach. Gawking at the grand houses on 17-Mile Drive, taking in the coastal vistas and the roars of the crowds tracking Tiger Woods, Pinkney saw a future he’d never envisioned.

“I thought to myself, ‘All these possibilities — this is what golf is about,’” he says. “I started imagining doing things I never would have even dreamed about before.”

As his own game improved, Pinkney rose through the Ace ranks from driver to instructor to program coordinator. Sociable by nature, he built a Rolodex and worked his contacts, growing enrollment, raising funds. Fast-forward to the present. The Ace Kids Golf Foundation, as it is called today, is a vibrant force in East Bay junior golf, with year-round offerings for youngsters ages 5 to 18. Just before the pandemic, nearly 1,000 kids took part annually in Ace programs, a number that fell slightly during lockdowns, but which has now risen close to what it was.

I thought to myself, ‘All these possibilities — this is what golf is about.’ I started imagining doing things I never would have even dreamed about before.

preston pinkney

In everything Ace does, Pinkney is its lodestar, a guiding light.

“He’s got such dedication and such amazing people skills, he’s become a truly powerful voice within the community and for the community,” says Tony Canedo, a PGA-certified teaching professional who serves as Ace’s lead instructor. “We have all these ideas, all of these ambitions for how we can help the kids, and finding the resources to accomplish those things isn’t easy. Somehow, when we need something, Preston always seems to find a way to get things done.”

Last year, Pinkney tasked himself with doing even more. For all that Ace provided, Pinkney knew the program had built-in limits. After 18, its youngsters aged out. What about the kids who wanted to keep at it, who hoped to play competitively in college or beyond, or to make a living elsewhere in the game? Such ambitions called for talent and motivation but also money, training and other backing.

In early 2020, with his wife, JaVonnie, Pinkney founded African American Tour Quest (AATQ). As its name suggests, the organization strives to promote diversity in the game by supporting young Black golfers in their goals, whether it’s to turn pro, teach, run tournaments or assume some other post in the industry. Though AATQ has just begun to gain its footing, it already has a handful of players in its stable, providing them with access to sports psychologist, trainers, practice facilities and more.

Among those golfers is Ed Hackett, 23, who played his freshman year at Alabama State, earning Southwestern Athletic Conference co-MVP honors, and who now stars at Cal State Monterey Bay. Another is Adrian Davis, only 19 but already seasoned on the California amateur circuit. Like Hackett, he dreams of turning pro.

From left: AATQ participant Tre Craig; AATQ director of player development Jeffrey “JC” Callaway; and Tour pro Joseph Bramlett.

Davis, who came up through the Ace program, is also now an Ace instructor, teaching youngsters the etiquette and swing fundamentals that he learned in the same classes when he was their age.

The Ace program is based out of Lake Chabot Golf Course, a laidback Oakland muni where Pinkney keeps an office. In his minimal spare time, he serves on the board of the Northern California Golf Association, which recently donated a simulator to the Ace program; Pinkney intends to make the machine a centerpiece of a high-tech teaching facility he’s trying to build at Lake Chabot, as a complement to the low-tech driving range his Ace kids use today.

Meanwhile, there is always other work to do. Among his many duties, Pinkney busies himself with outreach efforts to potential students and benefactors alike. The NBA star Steph Curry has given generously to both ACE and AATQ. Recently, Robert Baker, the noted golf coach known for his work with Ernie Els, donated 1,200 junior training sets, which Pinkney plans to use in golf development programs in public schools.

Through Ace, Pinkney says, his goal in the next three to five years is to make sure that every child in Oakland gets to touch a golf club.

Make it a simple introduction. You never know what might change from there.

generic profile image

Golf.com

A golf, food and travel writer, Josh Sens has been a GOLF Magazine contributor since 2004 and now contributes across all of GOLF’s platforms. His work has been anthologized in The Best American Sportswriting. He is also the co-author, with Sammy Hagar, of Are We Having Any Fun Yet: the Cooking and Partying Handbook.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631242413) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(87) "‘MRI’ scan reveals spectacular ice age landscapes beneath the North Sea – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(106) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/mri-scan-reveals-spectacular-ice-age-landscapes-beneath-the-north-sea-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(6) "skunky" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 02:50:32 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(106) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/mri-scan-reveals-spectacular-ice-age-landscapes-beneath-the-north-sea-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(93) "Journal Reference: James D. Kirkham, Kelly A. Hogan, Robert D. Larter, Ed Self, Ken Games,..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4436) "

Journal Reference:

  1. James D. Kirkham, Kelly A. Hogan, Robert D. Larter, Ed Self, Ken Games, Mads Huuse, Margaret A. Stewart, Dag Ottesen, Neil S. Arnold, Julian A. Dowdeswell. Tunnel valley infill and genesis revealed by high-resolution 3-D seismic data. Geology, 2021; DOI: 10.1130/G49048.1

For the first time an international team of scientists can show previously undetectable landscapes that formed beneath the vast ice sheets that covered much of the UK and Western Europe thousands to millions of years ago. These ancient structures provide clues to how ice sheets react to a warming climate. The findings are published this week (9 September) in the journal Geology.

So called tunnel valleys, buried hundreds of metres beneath the seafloor in the North Sea are remnants of huge rivers that were the ‘plumbing system’ of the ancient ice sheets as they melted in response to rising air temperatures.

Lead author James Kirkham, from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and the University of Cambridge, says:

“The origin of these channels was unresolved for over a century. This discovery will help us better understand the ongoing retreat of present-day glaciers in Antarctica and Greenland.

“In the way that we can leave footprints in the sand, glaciers leave an imprint on the land upon which they flow. Our new cutting edge data gives us important markers of deglaciation. “

Dr Kelly Hogan, co-author and a geophysicist at BAS, says:

“Although we have known about the huge glacial channels in the North Sea for some time, this is the first time we have imaged fine-scale landforms within them. These delicate features tell us about how water moved through the channels (beneath the ice) and even how ice simply stagnated and melted away. It is very difficult to observe what goes on underneath our large ice sheets today, particularly how moving water and sediment is affecting ice flow and we know that these are important controls on ice behaviour. As a result, using these ancient channels to understand how ice will respond to changing conditions in a warming climate is extremely relevant and timely.”

3D seismic reflection technology, which was provided by industry partners, uses sound waves to generate detailed three-dimensional representations of ancient landscapes buried deep beneath the surface of the Earth, in a similar manner to how magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can image structures within the human body. The method can image features as small as a few metres beneath the surface of the Earth, even if they are buried under hundreds of metres of sediment. The exceptional detail provided by this new data reveals the imprint of how the ice interacted with the channels as they formed. By comparing these ancient ‘ice fingerprints’ to those left beneath modern glaciers, the scientists were able to reconstruct how these ancient ice sheets behaved as they receded.

By diving into the past, this work provides a window into a future warmer world where new processes may begin to alter the plumbing system and flow behaviour of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets.

Video showing ancient sub-ocean landscapes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Vuia0znHik

‘MRI’ scan reveals spectacular ice age landscapes beneath the North Sea

" } ["summary"]=> string(93) "Journal Reference: James D. Kirkham, Kelly A. Hogan, Robert D. Larter, Ed Self, Ken Games,..." ["atom_content"]=> string(4436) "

Journal Reference:

  1. James D. Kirkham, Kelly A. Hogan, Robert D. Larter, Ed Self, Ken Games, Mads Huuse, Margaret A. Stewart, Dag Ottesen, Neil S. Arnold, Julian A. Dowdeswell. Tunnel valley infill and genesis revealed by high-resolution 3-D seismic data. Geology, 2021; DOI: 10.1130/G49048.1

For the first time an international team of scientists can show previously undetectable landscapes that formed beneath the vast ice sheets that covered much of the UK and Western Europe thousands to millions of years ago. These ancient structures provide clues to how ice sheets react to a warming climate. The findings are published this week (9 September) in the journal Geology.

So called tunnel valleys, buried hundreds of metres beneath the seafloor in the North Sea are remnants of huge rivers that were the ‘plumbing system’ of the ancient ice sheets as they melted in response to rising air temperatures.

Lead author James Kirkham, from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and the University of Cambridge, says:

“The origin of these channels was unresolved for over a century. This discovery will help us better understand the ongoing retreat of present-day glaciers in Antarctica and Greenland.

“In the way that we can leave footprints in the sand, glaciers leave an imprint on the land upon which they flow. Our new cutting edge data gives us important markers of deglaciation. “

Dr Kelly Hogan, co-author and a geophysicist at BAS, says:

“Although we have known about the huge glacial channels in the North Sea for some time, this is the first time we have imaged fine-scale landforms within them. These delicate features tell us about how water moved through the channels (beneath the ice) and even how ice simply stagnated and melted away. It is very difficult to observe what goes on underneath our large ice sheets today, particularly how moving water and sediment is affecting ice flow and we know that these are important controls on ice behaviour. As a result, using these ancient channels to understand how ice will respond to changing conditions in a warming climate is extremely relevant and timely.”

3D seismic reflection technology, which was provided by industry partners, uses sound waves to generate detailed three-dimensional representations of ancient landscapes buried deep beneath the surface of the Earth, in a similar manner to how magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can image structures within the human body. The method can image features as small as a few metres beneath the surface of the Earth, even if they are buried under hundreds of metres of sediment. The exceptional detail provided by this new data reveals the imprint of how the ice interacted with the channels as they formed. By comparing these ancient ‘ice fingerprints’ to those left beneath modern glaciers, the scientists were able to reconstruct how these ancient ice sheets behaved as they receded.

By diving into the past, this work provides a window into a future warmer world where new processes may begin to alter the plumbing system and flow behaviour of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets.

Video showing ancient sub-ocean landscapes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Vuia0znHik

‘MRI’ scan reveals spectacular ice age landscapes beneath the North Sea

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631242232) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(80) "PSG Dominates The List Of Highest Salaries For Players Signed At ‘zero Cost’" ["link"]=> string(103) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/psg-dominates-the-list-of-highest-salaries-for-players-signed-at-zero-cost/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 01:51:18 +0000" ["category"]=> string(52) "NewscostdominatesHighestlistplayersPSGSalariesSigned" ["guid"]=> string(103) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/psg-dominates-the-list-of-highest-salaries-for-players-signed-at-zero-cost/" ["description"]=> string(90) "There are advantages to signing a player ‘for free’, but a disadvantage is that the..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4542) "

There are advantages to signing a player ‘for free’, but a disadvantage is that the salary becomes very high if it is a superstar

Dreaming of winning the Champions League, Paris Saint-Germain were one of the most active clubs in the last transfer window. Despite having bought the right back, Achraf hakimi, of the Inter Milan for almost 83 million dollars, the French club has focused on agreements with players without a contract, highlighting the agreement with Lionel messi.

However, despite not having amounts involved in the acquisition of rights, negotiations with players without a contract are not cheap for him. PSG. In a survey conducted by the consultancy KPMG, Among the top 10 deals made in the window with free footballers, Parisians will pay four of the five highest salaries.

The report took into account the 10 players traded in this model during the last transfer period with the highest market value in the consultancy’s valuation. Messi, for example, is at the top of the two rankings, with the highest market capitalization (108 million 880 thousand dollars) and salary (41 million 421 thousand dollars).

Then the PSG with the 14 million dollars that he will pay Sergio Ramos per season, the same amount that Real Madrid must pay in salaries to David praise – the market value of the Austrian, however, today is larger than the Spanish, according to KPMG.

Barcelona was also reinforced with “zero cost” transfers. In economic crisis, the Catalan club signed the forwards Memphis Depay and Sergio Agüero and defender Eric García at the end of their contract. In salaries, however, the trio together will add up to almost $ 12 million per season.

Here are the top 10 players signed “free” in the last transfer window and the annual salary ranking:

1. Lionel Messi – forward, PSG
$ 41 million

2. David Alaba – winger, Real Madrid
$ 14 million

2. Sergio Ramos – defending, PSG
$ 14 million

4. Georginio Wijnaldum – Half, PSG
$ 12 million

5. Gianluigi Donnarumma – goalkeeper, PSG
$ 8 million

6. Jérome Boateng – defender, Lyon
$ 7 million

7. Sergio Agüero – forward, Barcelona
$ 6 million

7. Hakan Çalhanoglu – midfielder, Inter Milan
$ 6 million

7. Memphis Depay – forward, Barcelona
$ 6 million

10. Eric García – defender, Barcelona
$ 1.6 million

.

" } ["summary"]=> string(90) "There are advantages to signing a player ‘for free’, but a disadvantage is that the..." ["atom_content"]=> string(4542) "

There are advantages to signing a player ‘for free’, but a disadvantage is that the salary becomes very high if it is a superstar

Dreaming of winning the Champions League, Paris Saint-Germain were one of the most active clubs in the last transfer window. Despite having bought the right back, Achraf hakimi, of the Inter Milan for almost 83 million dollars, the French club has focused on agreements with players without a contract, highlighting the agreement with Lionel messi.

However, despite not having amounts involved in the acquisition of rights, negotiations with players without a contract are not cheap for him. PSG. In a survey conducted by the consultancy KPMG, Among the top 10 deals made in the window with free footballers, Parisians will pay four of the five highest salaries.

The report took into account the 10 players traded in this model during the last transfer period with the highest market value in the consultancy’s valuation. Messi, for example, is at the top of the two rankings, with the highest market capitalization (108 million 880 thousand dollars) and salary (41 million 421 thousand dollars).

Then the PSG with the 14 million dollars that he will pay Sergio Ramos per season, the same amount that Real Madrid must pay in salaries to David praise – the market value of the Austrian, however, today is larger than the Spanish, according to KPMG.

Barcelona was also reinforced with “zero cost” transfers. In economic crisis, the Catalan club signed the forwards Memphis Depay and Sergio Agüero and defender Eric García at the end of their contract. In salaries, however, the trio together will add up to almost $ 12 million per season.

Here are the top 10 players signed “free” in the last transfer window and the annual salary ranking:

1. Lionel Messi – forward, PSG
$ 41 million

2. David Alaba – winger, Real Madrid
$ 14 million

2. Sergio Ramos – defending, PSG
$ 14 million

4. Georginio Wijnaldum – Half, PSG
$ 12 million

5. Gianluigi Donnarumma – goalkeeper, PSG
$ 8 million

6. Jérome Boateng – defender, Lyon
$ 7 million

7. Sergio Agüero – forward, Barcelona
$ 6 million

7. Hakan Çalhanoglu – midfielder, Inter Milan
$ 6 million

7. Memphis Depay – forward, Barcelona
$ 6 million

10. Eric García – defender, Barcelona
$ 1.6 million

.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631238678) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(92) "Scientists solve mystery of icy plumes that may foretell deadly supercell storms – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(117) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/scientists-solve-mystery-of-icy-plumes-that-may-foretell-deadly-supercell-storms-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(6) "skunky" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 01:48:55 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(117) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/scientists-solve-mystery-of-icy-plumes-that-may-foretell-deadly-supercell-storms-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(114) "Journal Reference: Morgan E O’Neill, Leigh Orf, Gerald M. Heymsfield, Kelton Halbert. Hydraulic jump dynamics..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7293) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Morgan E O’Neill, Leigh Orf, Gerald M. Heymsfield, Kelton Halbert. Hydraulic jump dynamics above supercell thunderstorms. Science, 2021; 373 (6560): 1248 DOI: 10.1126/science.abh3857

A new Stanford University-led study, published Sept. 10 in Science, reveals the physical mechanism for these plumes, which form above most of the world’s most damaging tornadoes.

Previous research has shown they’re easy to spot in satellite imagery, often 30 minutes or more before severe weather reaches the ground. “The question is, why is this plume associated with the worst conditions, and how does it exist in the first place? That’s the gap that we are starting to fill,” said atmospheric scientist Morgan O’Neill, lead author of the new study.

The research comes just over a week after supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes spun up among the remnants of Hurricane Ida as they barreled into the U.S. Northeast, compounding devastation wrought across the region by record-breaking rainfall and flash floods.

Understanding how and why plumes take shape above powerful thunderstorms could help forecasters recognize similar impending dangers and issue more accurate warnings without relying on Doppler radar systems, which can be knocked out by wind and hail — and have blind spots even on good days. In many parts of the world, Doppler radar coverage is nonexistent.

“If there’s going to be a terrible hurricane, we can see it from space. We can’t see tornadoes because they’re hidden below thunderstorm tops. We need to understand the tops better,” said O’Neill, who is an assistant professor of Earth system science at Stanford’s School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences (Stanford Earth).

Supercell storms and exploding turbulence

The thunderstorms that spawn most tornadoes are known as supercells, a rare breed of storm with a rotating updraft that can hurtle skyward at speeds faster than 150 miles an hour, with enough power to punch through the usual lid on Earth’s troposphere, the lowest layer of our atmosphere.

In weaker thunderstorms, rising currents of moist air tend to flatten and spread out upon reaching this lid, called the tropopause, forming an anvil-shaped cloud. A supercell thunderstorm’s intense updraft presses the tropopause upward into the next layer of the atmosphere, creating what scientists call an overshooting top. “It’s like a fountain pushing up against the next layer of our atmosphere,” O’Neill said.

As winds in the upper atmosphere race over and around the protruding storm top, they sometimes kick up streams of water vapor and ice, which shoot into the stratosphere to form the tell-tale plume, technically called an Above-Anvil Cirrus Plume, or AACP.

The rising air of the overshooting top soon speeds back toward the troposphere, like a ball that accelerates downward after cresting aloft. At the same time, air is flowing over the dome in the stratosphere and then racing down the sheltered side.

Using computer simulations of idealized supercell thunderstorms, O’Neill and colleagues discovered that this excites a downslope windstorm at the tropopause, where wind speeds exceed 240 miles per hour. “Dry air descending from the stratosphere and moist air rising from the troposphere join in this very narrow, crazy-fast jet. The jet becomes unstable and the whole thing mixes and explodes in turbulence,” O’Neill said. “These speeds at the storm top have never been observed or hypothesized before.”

Hydraulic jump

Scientists have long recognized that overshooting storm tops of moist air rising into the upper atmosphere can act like solid obstacles that block or redirect airflow. And it’s been proposed that waves of moist air flowing over these tops can break and loft water into the stratosphere. But no research to date has explained how all the pieces fit together.

The new modeling suggests the explosion of turbulence in the atmosphere that accompanies plumed storms unfolds through a phenomenon called a hydraulic jump. The same mechanism is at play when rushing winds tumble over mountains and generate turbulence on the downslope side, or when water speeding smoothly down a dam’s spillway abruptly bursts into froth upon joining slower-moving water below.

Leonardo DaVinci observed the phenomenon in flowing water as early as the 1500s, and ancient Romans may have sought to limit hydraulic jumps in aqueduct designs. But until now atmospheric scientists have only seen the dynamic induced by solid topography. The new modeling suggests a hydraulic jump can also be triggered by fluid obstacles in the atmosphere made almost entirely of air and which are changing shape every second, miles above the Earth’s surface.

The simulations suggest the onset of the jump coincides with a surprisingly rapid injection of water vapor into the stratosphere, upwards of 7000 kilograms per second. That’s two to four times higher than previous estimates. Once it reaches the overworld, water may stay there for days or weeks, potentially influencing the amount and quality of sunlight that reaches Earth via destruction of ozone in the stratosphere and warming the planet’s surface. “In our simulations that exhibit plumes, water reaches deep into the stratosphere, where it possibly could have more of a long-term climate impact,” said co-author Leigh Orf, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

According to O’Neill, high-altitude NASA research aircraft have only recently gained the ability to observe the three-dimensional winds at the tops of thunderstorms, and have not yet observed AACP production at close range. “We have the technology now to go verify our modeling results to see if they’re realistic,” O’Neill said. “That’s really a sweet spot in science.”

This research was supported by the National Science Foundation and the NASA Precipitation Measurement Mission and Ground Validation program.

Scientists solve mystery of icy plumes that may foretell deadly supercell storms

" } ["summary"]=> string(114) "Journal Reference: Morgan E O’Neill, Leigh Orf, Gerald M. Heymsfield, Kelton Halbert. Hydraulic jump dynamics..." ["atom_content"]=> string(7293) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Morgan E O’Neill, Leigh Orf, Gerald M. Heymsfield, Kelton Halbert. Hydraulic jump dynamics above supercell thunderstorms. Science, 2021; 373 (6560): 1248 DOI: 10.1126/science.abh3857

A new Stanford University-led study, published Sept. 10 in Science, reveals the physical mechanism for these plumes, which form above most of the world’s most damaging tornadoes.

Previous research has shown they’re easy to spot in satellite imagery, often 30 minutes or more before severe weather reaches the ground. “The question is, why is this plume associated with the worst conditions, and how does it exist in the first place? That’s the gap that we are starting to fill,” said atmospheric scientist Morgan O’Neill, lead author of the new study.

The research comes just over a week after supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes spun up among the remnants of Hurricane Ida as they barreled into the U.S. Northeast, compounding devastation wrought across the region by record-breaking rainfall and flash floods.

Understanding how and why plumes take shape above powerful thunderstorms could help forecasters recognize similar impending dangers and issue more accurate warnings without relying on Doppler radar systems, which can be knocked out by wind and hail — and have blind spots even on good days. In many parts of the world, Doppler radar coverage is nonexistent.

“If there’s going to be a terrible hurricane, we can see it from space. We can’t see tornadoes because they’re hidden below thunderstorm tops. We need to understand the tops better,” said O’Neill, who is an assistant professor of Earth system science at Stanford’s School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences (Stanford Earth).

Supercell storms and exploding turbulence

The thunderstorms that spawn most tornadoes are known as supercells, a rare breed of storm with a rotating updraft that can hurtle skyward at speeds faster than 150 miles an hour, with enough power to punch through the usual lid on Earth’s troposphere, the lowest layer of our atmosphere.

In weaker thunderstorms, rising currents of moist air tend to flatten and spread out upon reaching this lid, called the tropopause, forming an anvil-shaped cloud. A supercell thunderstorm’s intense updraft presses the tropopause upward into the next layer of the atmosphere, creating what scientists call an overshooting top. “It’s like a fountain pushing up against the next layer of our atmosphere,” O’Neill said.

As winds in the upper atmosphere race over and around the protruding storm top, they sometimes kick up streams of water vapor and ice, which shoot into the stratosphere to form the tell-tale plume, technically called an Above-Anvil Cirrus Plume, or AACP.

The rising air of the overshooting top soon speeds back toward the troposphere, like a ball that accelerates downward after cresting aloft. At the same time, air is flowing over the dome in the stratosphere and then racing down the sheltered side.

Using computer simulations of idealized supercell thunderstorms, O’Neill and colleagues discovered that this excites a downslope windstorm at the tropopause, where wind speeds exceed 240 miles per hour. “Dry air descending from the stratosphere and moist air rising from the troposphere join in this very narrow, crazy-fast jet. The jet becomes unstable and the whole thing mixes and explodes in turbulence,” O’Neill said. “These speeds at the storm top have never been observed or hypothesized before.”

Hydraulic jump

Scientists have long recognized that overshooting storm tops of moist air rising into the upper atmosphere can act like solid obstacles that block or redirect airflow. And it’s been proposed that waves of moist air flowing over these tops can break and loft water into the stratosphere. But no research to date has explained how all the pieces fit together.

The new modeling suggests the explosion of turbulence in the atmosphere that accompanies plumed storms unfolds through a phenomenon called a hydraulic jump. The same mechanism is at play when rushing winds tumble over mountains and generate turbulence on the downslope side, or when water speeding smoothly down a dam’s spillway abruptly bursts into froth upon joining slower-moving water below.

Leonardo DaVinci observed the phenomenon in flowing water as early as the 1500s, and ancient Romans may have sought to limit hydraulic jumps in aqueduct designs. But until now atmospheric scientists have only seen the dynamic induced by solid topography. The new modeling suggests a hydraulic jump can also be triggered by fluid obstacles in the atmosphere made almost entirely of air and which are changing shape every second, miles above the Earth’s surface.

The simulations suggest the onset of the jump coincides with a surprisingly rapid injection of water vapor into the stratosphere, upwards of 7000 kilograms per second. That’s two to four times higher than previous estimates. Once it reaches the overworld, water may stay there for days or weeks, potentially influencing the amount and quality of sunlight that reaches Earth via destruction of ozone in the stratosphere and warming the planet’s surface. “In our simulations that exhibit plumes, water reaches deep into the stratosphere, where it possibly could have more of a long-term climate impact,” said co-author Leigh Orf, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

According to O’Neill, high-altitude NASA research aircraft have only recently gained the ability to observe the three-dimensional winds at the tops of thunderstorms, and have not yet observed AACP production at close range. “We have the technology now to go verify our modeling results to see if they’re realistic,” O’Neill said. “That’s really a sweet spot in science.”

This research was supported by the National Science Foundation and the NASA Precipitation Measurement Mission and Ground Validation program.

Scientists solve mystery of icy plumes that may foretell deadly supercell storms

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631238535) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(66) "Mark Calcavecchia returns to PGA Tour Champions after back surgery" ["link"]=> string(95) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/mark-calcavecchia-returns-to-pga-tour-champions-after-back-surgery/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 00:50:40 +0000" ["category"]=> string(90) "NewsCalcavecchiaChampionsMarkmark calcavecchiaPGApga tour championsreturnssurgeryTourvideo" ["guid"]=> string(95) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/mark-calcavecchia-returns-to-pga-tour-champions-after-back-surgery/" ["description"]=> string(96) "Friday morning Mark Calcavecchia will walk to the first tee at Norwood Hills Country Club in..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6016) "

Friday morning Mark Calcavecchia will walk to the first tee at Norwood Hills Country Club in St. Louis, stick a peg in the ground and do something he hasn’t done in 264 days.

Hit a golf ball in competition.

It’s the longest layoff Calcavecchia has had since he took up the game almost a half century ago.

“I broke my wrist in high school and was out three months, and five years ago I went through a window and severed a tendon and also was out three months,” Calcavecchia said. “This was a lot tougher than I thought it would be. I was miserable for four months.”

The Jupiter resident knew he would be looking at a lengthy rehab when he underwent back-fusion surgery Jan. 4 to deal with an injury that has bothered him for a decade. He felt he had no choice. His last event was playing with his son, Eric, in the PNC Championship on Dec. 20.

Calcavecchia has dealt with back pain for years, treating it with epidurals and cortisone shots. But after the pain started shooting down his leg – and he was knocked to the ground by back spasms last October – he knew it was time to have surgery similar to what Tiger Woods had done (but with different vertebrae).

Then came the hard part for Calcavecchia: Not only the rehab, but watching others play golf.

“At the start of 2020, I was thinking about retiring,” Calcavecchia said. “But then the pandemic set in and we didn’t play for five months. That’s when I knew I wasn’t retiring. I was bored stiff. I still love playing.”

One can imagine how the last nine months have been for him. At 61, can Calcavecchia regain the touch that helped him win 13 PGA Tour titles, including the 1989 British Open, and four titles on the PGA Tour Champions?

“My expectations are pretty low,” he said. “I’m certainly not thinking I’m going to light it up at my age and have a chance to win. It’s just nice to play again. I’ve missed competing and being around the guys.”

Calcavecchia said he was shooting around par during practice rounds in Columbus, Ohio last week. He’s hitting one more club than he used to and said his biggest issue is loosening up, not pain.

Not being able to swing a club full-bore for most of 2021 has had one benefit.

“My short game is phenomenal,” he said. “It’s kind of like the old days. I half expect to chip-in.”

This week’s Ascension Charity Classic is Calcavecchia’s 991st combined start on the PGA Tour and PGA Tour Champions. He should be able to join the rare club of players who have made a combined 1,000 starts on the two tours.

It’s unlikely, though, he’ll get to return to the scene of his last victory: The TimberTech Championship (Nov. 5-7) at Broken Sound Club in Boca Raton. The tournament has become the second event in the Charles Schwab Cup Playoffs, and only the top 54 on the money list get to play on the Old Course.

Calcavecchia is 95th on the tour’s two-year money list with $74,782. John Daly is currently 54th at $429,960.

“I’d love to play at Boca, but it’s highly unlikely,” Calcavecchia said. “I would have to win and maybe a couple of top-5s. But you never know.”

It’s been a tough 12 months for Calcavecchia. In addition to the surgery, he contracted a serious case of COVID-19 last September. And this week, Calcavecchia and wife Brenda lost one of their beloved dogs who travels with them, Brutus, who was almost 17.

Life goes on. Playing golf returns.

.

" } ["summary"]=> string(96) "Friday morning Mark Calcavecchia will walk to the first tee at Norwood Hills Country Club in..." ["atom_content"]=> string(6016) "

Friday morning Mark Calcavecchia will walk to the first tee at Norwood Hills Country Club in St. Louis, stick a peg in the ground and do something he hasn’t done in 264 days.

Hit a golf ball in competition.

It’s the longest layoff Calcavecchia has had since he took up the game almost a half century ago.

“I broke my wrist in high school and was out three months, and five years ago I went through a window and severed a tendon and also was out three months,” Calcavecchia said. “This was a lot tougher than I thought it would be. I was miserable for four months.”

The Jupiter resident knew he would be looking at a lengthy rehab when he underwent back-fusion surgery Jan. 4 to deal with an injury that has bothered him for a decade. He felt he had no choice. His last event was playing with his son, Eric, in the PNC Championship on Dec. 20.

Calcavecchia has dealt with back pain for years, treating it with epidurals and cortisone shots. But after the pain started shooting down his leg – and he was knocked to the ground by back spasms last October – he knew it was time to have surgery similar to what Tiger Woods had done (but with different vertebrae).

Then came the hard part for Calcavecchia: Not only the rehab, but watching others play golf.

“At the start of 2020, I was thinking about retiring,” Calcavecchia said. “But then the pandemic set in and we didn’t play for five months. That’s when I knew I wasn’t retiring. I was bored stiff. I still love playing.”

One can imagine how the last nine months have been for him. At 61, can Calcavecchia regain the touch that helped him win 13 PGA Tour titles, including the 1989 British Open, and four titles on the PGA Tour Champions?

“My expectations are pretty low,” he said. “I’m certainly not thinking I’m going to light it up at my age and have a chance to win. It’s just nice to play again. I’ve missed competing and being around the guys.”

Calcavecchia said he was shooting around par during practice rounds in Columbus, Ohio last week. He’s hitting one more club than he used to and said his biggest issue is loosening up, not pain.

Not being able to swing a club full-bore for most of 2021 has had one benefit.

“My short game is phenomenal,” he said. “It’s kind of like the old days. I half expect to chip-in.”

This week’s Ascension Charity Classic is Calcavecchia’s 991st combined start on the PGA Tour and PGA Tour Champions. He should be able to join the rare club of players who have made a combined 1,000 starts on the two tours.

It’s unlikely, though, he’ll get to return to the scene of his last victory: The TimberTech Championship (Nov. 5-7) at Broken Sound Club in Boca Raton. The tournament has become the second event in the Charles Schwab Cup Playoffs, and only the top 54 on the money list get to play on the Old Course.

Calcavecchia is 95th on the tour’s two-year money list with $74,782. John Daly is currently 54th at $429,960.

“I’d love to play at Boca, but it’s highly unlikely,” Calcavecchia said. “I would have to win and maybe a couple of top-5s. But you never know.”

It’s been a tough 12 months for Calcavecchia. In addition to the surgery, he contracted a serious case of COVID-19 last September. And this week, Calcavecchia and wife Brenda lost one of their beloved dogs who travels with them, Brutus, who was almost 17.

Life goes on. Playing golf returns.

.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631235040) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(80) "Who was king before Tyrannosaurus? Uzbek fossil reveals new top dino – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(104) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/who-was-king-before-tyrannosaurus-uzbek-fossil-reveals-new-top-dino-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(6) "skunky" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 00:48:21 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(104) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/who-was-king-before-tyrannosaurus-uzbek-fossil-reveals-new-top-dino-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(132) "Journal Reference: Kohei Tanaka, Otabek Ulugbek Ogli Anvarov, Darla K. Zelenitsky, Akhmadjon Shayakubovich Ahmedshaev, Yoshitsugu..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4080) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Kohei Tanaka, Otabek Ulugbek Ogli Anvarov, Darla K. Zelenitsky, Akhmadjon Shayakubovich Ahmedshaev, Yoshitsugu Kobayashi. A new carcharodontosaurian theropod dinosaur occupies apex predator niche in the early Late Cretaceous of Uzbekistan. Royal Society Open Science, 2021; 8 (9): 210923 DOI: 10.1098/rsos.210923

In a new study published in Royal Society Open Science, a research team led by the University of Tsukuba has described a new genus and species belonging to the Carcharodontosauria, a group of medium- to large-sized carnivorous dinosaurs that preceded the tyrannosauroids as apex predators.

The new dinosaur, named Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis, was found in the lower Upper Cretaceous Bissekty Formation of the Kyzylkum Desert in Uzbekistan, and therefore lived about 90 million years ago. Two separate evolutionary analyses support classification of the new dinosaur as the first definitive carcharodontosaurian discovered in the Upper Cretaceous of Central Asia.

“We described this new genus and species based on a single isolated fossil, a left maxilla, or upper jawbone,” explains study first author Assistant Professor Kohei Tanaka. “Among theropod dinosaurs, the size of the maxilla can be used to estimate the animal’s size because it correlates with femur length, a well-established indicator of body size. Thus, we were able to estimate that Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis had a mass of over 1,000 kg, and was approximately 7.5 to 8.0 meters in length, greater than the length of a full-grown African elephant.”

This size greatly exceeds that of any other carnivore known from the Bissekty Formation, including the small-sized tyrannosauroid Timurlengia described from the same formation. Therefore, the newly named dinosaur likely topped the food web in its early Late Cretaceous ecosystem.

The genus’s namesake is fittingly regal; Ulughbegsaurus is named for Ulugh Beg, the 15th century mathematician, astronomer, and sultan of the Timurid Empire of Central Asia. The species is named for the country where the fossil was discovered.

Before the Late Cretaceous, carcharodontosaurians like Ulughbegsaurus disappeared from the paleocontinent that included Central Asia. This disappearance is thought to have been related to the rise of tyrannosauroids as apex predators, but this transition has remained poorly understood because of the scarcity of relevant fossils.

Senior author Professor Yoshitsugu Kobayashi at the Hokkaido University Museum explains “The discovery of Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis fills an important gap in the fossil record, revealing that carcharodontosaurians were widespread across the continent from Europe to East Asia. As one of the latest surviving carcharodontosaurians in Laurasia, this large predator’s coexistence with a smaller tyrannosauroid reveals important constraints on the transition of the apex predator niche in the Late Cretaceous.”

Who was king before Tyrannosaurus? Uzbek fossil reveals new top dino

" } ["summary"]=> string(132) "Journal Reference: Kohei Tanaka, Otabek Ulugbek Ogli Anvarov, Darla K. Zelenitsky, Akhmadjon Shayakubovich Ahmedshaev, Yoshitsugu..." ["atom_content"]=> string(4080) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Kohei Tanaka, Otabek Ulugbek Ogli Anvarov, Darla K. Zelenitsky, Akhmadjon Shayakubovich Ahmedshaev, Yoshitsugu Kobayashi. A new carcharodontosaurian theropod dinosaur occupies apex predator niche in the early Late Cretaceous of Uzbekistan. Royal Society Open Science, 2021; 8 (9): 210923 DOI: 10.1098/rsos.210923

In a new study published in Royal Society Open Science, a research team led by the University of Tsukuba has described a new genus and species belonging to the Carcharodontosauria, a group of medium- to large-sized carnivorous dinosaurs that preceded the tyrannosauroids as apex predators.

The new dinosaur, named Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis, was found in the lower Upper Cretaceous Bissekty Formation of the Kyzylkum Desert in Uzbekistan, and therefore lived about 90 million years ago. Two separate evolutionary analyses support classification of the new dinosaur as the first definitive carcharodontosaurian discovered in the Upper Cretaceous of Central Asia.

“We described this new genus and species based on a single isolated fossil, a left maxilla, or upper jawbone,” explains study first author Assistant Professor Kohei Tanaka. “Among theropod dinosaurs, the size of the maxilla can be used to estimate the animal’s size because it correlates with femur length, a well-established indicator of body size. Thus, we were able to estimate that Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis had a mass of over 1,000 kg, and was approximately 7.5 to 8.0 meters in length, greater than the length of a full-grown African elephant.”

This size greatly exceeds that of any other carnivore known from the Bissekty Formation, including the small-sized tyrannosauroid Timurlengia described from the same formation. Therefore, the newly named dinosaur likely topped the food web in its early Late Cretaceous ecosystem.

The genus’s namesake is fittingly regal; Ulughbegsaurus is named for Ulugh Beg, the 15th century mathematician, astronomer, and sultan of the Timurid Empire of Central Asia. The species is named for the country where the fossil was discovered.

Before the Late Cretaceous, carcharodontosaurians like Ulughbegsaurus disappeared from the paleocontinent that included Central Asia. This disappearance is thought to have been related to the rise of tyrannosauroids as apex predators, but this transition has remained poorly understood because of the scarcity of relevant fossils.

Senior author Professor Yoshitsugu Kobayashi at the Hokkaido University Museum explains “The discovery of Ulughbegsaurus uzbekistanensis fills an important gap in the fossil record, revealing that carcharodontosaurians were widespread across the continent from Europe to East Asia. As one of the latest surviving carcharodontosaurians in Laurasia, this large predator’s coexistence with a smaller tyrannosauroid reveals important constraints on the transition of the apex predator niche in the Late Cretaceous.”

Who was king before Tyrannosaurus? Uzbek fossil reveals new top dino

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631234901) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(63) "Out Of! 5 Teams Are Officially Eliminated From The MLB Playoffs" ["link"]=> string(91) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/out-of-5-teams-are-officially-eliminated-from-the-mlb-playoffs/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(11) "Susan Hally" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 09 Sep 2021 23:48:53 +0000" ["category"]=> string(40) "NewseliminatedMLBofficiallyPlayoffsteams" ["guid"]=> string(91) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/out-of-5-teams-are-officially-eliminated-from-the-mlb-playoffs/" ["description"]=> string(87) "While in baseball nothing is ever completely certain and at any moment even the most..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(3737) "

While in baseball nothing is ever completely certain and at any moment even the most unlikely can happen, the truth is that trends and forecasts are often correct and at the start of the current MLB season, as well as how there were favorites to reach the postseason and fight for the championship, there were also to be coleros and sotaneros of their respective divisions and leagues.

At this point in the regular season, although there are no teams officially qualified for the playoffs yet, there are already those that are mathematically eliminated, with five so far that have absolutely no chance of sneaking into the postseason spots: Los Arizona Diamondbacks, Colorado Rockies, Baltimore Orioles, Pittsburgh Pirates and Texas Rangers.

These 5 teams are officially marked as eliminated from the playoff contest, with each one of them at the bottom of their respective divisions with the exception of the Rockies, who are second to last in the West of the National League, which has been dominated by the Giants, Dodgers and Padres.

The next team to be eliminated would be the Chicago Cubs, since if they fall one more game behind in the fight for the wild card, they would be mathematically eliminated from any contention by the playoffs, followed by the Kansas City Royals and the Minnesota Twins. who are 6 games away from being completely out of the playoffs.

Gabriel Delgado

I started as a rookie on Al Bat in early 2018 and am going for my third season covering Major League Baseball as a web reporter. I am a fan of the San Francisco Giants, a number one defender of Barry Bonds and a critic of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Fernando Tatis Jr., Juan Soto and Ronald Acuña are the future of baseball, Mike Trout is overrated, and the Astros deserved to be taken away from the World Series for cheating. Besides baseball, I also enjoy soccer, football, basketball, and just about any other game that includes a ball or a ball. I am also an amateur musician, penniless gamer and very nerdy. Graduated in journalism from the University of Guadalajara, I graduated in 2017. Born in the shrimp capital of the world, Escuinapa, Sinaloa. I lived in Australia for a while; i survived giant spiders, tasmanian devils, and fought a kangaroo and didn’t die trying.

see more

.

" } ["summary"]=> string(87) "While in baseball nothing is ever completely certain and at any moment even the most..." ["atom_content"]=> string(3737) "

While in baseball nothing is ever completely certain and at any moment even the most unlikely can happen, the truth is that trends and forecasts are often correct and at the start of the current MLB season, as well as how there were favorites to reach the postseason and fight for the championship, there were also to be coleros and sotaneros of their respective divisions and leagues.

At this point in the regular season, although there are no teams officially qualified for the playoffs yet, there are already those that are mathematically eliminated, with five so far that have absolutely no chance of sneaking into the postseason spots: Los Arizona Diamondbacks, Colorado Rockies, Baltimore Orioles, Pittsburgh Pirates and Texas Rangers.

These 5 teams are officially marked as eliminated from the playoff contest, with each one of them at the bottom of their respective divisions with the exception of the Rockies, who are second to last in the West of the National League, which has been dominated by the Giants, Dodgers and Padres.

The next team to be eliminated would be the Chicago Cubs, since if they fall one more game behind in the fight for the wild card, they would be mathematically eliminated from any contention by the playoffs, followed by the Kansas City Royals and the Minnesota Twins. who are 6 games away from being completely out of the playoffs.

Gabriel Delgado

I started as a rookie on Al Bat in early 2018 and am going for my third season covering Major League Baseball as a web reporter. I am a fan of the San Francisco Giants, a number one defender of Barry Bonds and a critic of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Fernando Tatis Jr., Juan Soto and Ronald Acuña are the future of baseball, Mike Trout is overrated, and the Astros deserved to be taken away from the World Series for cheating. Besides baseball, I also enjoy soccer, football, basketball, and just about any other game that includes a ball or a ball. I am also an amateur musician, penniless gamer and very nerdy. Graduated in journalism from the University of Guadalajara, I graduated in 2017. Born in the shrimp capital of the world, Escuinapa, Sinaloa. I lived in Australia for a while; i survived giant spiders, tasmanian devils, and fought a kangaroo and didn’t die trying.

see more

.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631231333) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(86) "Ancient marsupial ‘junk DNA’ might be useful after all, scientists say – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(104) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/ancient-marsupial-junk-dna-might-be-useful-after-all-scientists-say-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(6) "skunky" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Thu, 09 Sep 2021 23:46:13 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(104) "https://worldsportsnews.xyz/ancient-marsupial-junk-dna-might-be-useful-after-all-scientists-say-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(82) "Journal Reference: Emma F Harding, Alice G Russo, Grace J H Yan, Paul D Waters,..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7624) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Emma F Harding, Alice G Russo, Grace J H Yan, Paul D Waters, Peter A White. Ancient Viral Integrations in Marsupials: A Potential Antiviral Defence. Virus Evolution, 2021; DOI: 10.1093/ve/veab076

Researchers at UNSW Sydney, who examined the DNA and RNA of 13 Australian marsupial species, believe that viral fossils may be helping protect animals from infection.

“These viral fragments have been retained for a reason. Over millions of years of evolution, we would expect all DNA to change, however these fossils are preserved and kept intact,” says doctoral student and lead researcher Emma Harding, from UNSW’s School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences.

“Our study shows how the viruses buried in the animals’ DNA are used to make what we call non-coding RNAs, which carry out tasks inside the animal cells such as protecting against outside infection.

“The animal DNA has basically grabbed a viral sequence — which used to harm it — and ends up using it for its own benefit.”

If Ms Harding is right, her theory may have important implications for our understanding of the role of viral fossils in our own DNA and the animal kingdom in general. For example, viral fossils can be turned into RNA that binds specifically to the virus — and destroys it — if it tries to infect the cell again.

“This could be a mechanism similar to vaccination, but is inherited through generations. By keeping a viral fossil, the cell is immunised against future infection.

“If we can show it occurring in marsupials, it may also be occurring in other animals, including humans.

“So if we look more closely at the viral fossils inside our DNA, we could potentially get clues about how they may be protecting us,” Ms Harding says.

Evolutionary rewind

To understand how Ms Harding arrived at her conclusions, it’s worth stepping back a hundred million years to a time when Australia was once part of the Gondwanaland super-continent along with South America, Africa and Antarctica.

Scientists think the first marsupials originated in South America and later migrated to Australia via Antarctica. The lack of competing mammals in these southern regions may have allowed the marsupials to further evolve, with about 250 species now living in Australia, and about 120 in South America.

Ms Harding says when we look at the genetic makeup of Australian marsupials, the presence of viral fossils, known as endogenous viral elements (EVEs), are like time stamps marking when an animal was infected.

“My research looks at EVEs in Australian marsupials to firstly identify what types of viruses have integrated, and secondly investigate if they play an active role in the marsupial cells.

“One of the EVEs I found was from the Bornaviridae family of viruses, which first entered the animals’ DNA during the time of the dinosaurs when the South American and Australian landmasses were still joined together.

“Bornaviridae viruses were previously thought to have evolved 100 million years ago. But the one I found in almost every marsupial DNA we looked at puts it at 160 million years old — so it was great to be able to contribute to our knowledge of evolutionary history.

“By understanding how viruses have evolved, we can predict how they may change in the future, and plan strategies to prevent outbreaks.”

The work

The researchers examined multiple transcriptomes — the collection of all RNA in a cell — of Tasmanian devils, tammar wallabies, long-nosed bandicoots, fat-tailed dunnarts, bare-nosed wombats, koalas and sugar gliders. They also looked at single transcriptomes of a false antechinus, Southern brown bandicoot, striped possum, Western pygmy possum, brushtail possum and a yellow-footed rock wallaby.

They used the genetic sequence of modern viruses, such as Ebola and Zika, to hunt through the transcriptomes and look for matches — fragments of ancient marsupial viruses. The benefit of searching through the transcriptome rather than the genome is that it finds viral fragments that are still ‘switched on’ and transcribed — making RNA in the cells of marsupials, as opposed to stagnant fossils.

“Transcription is evidence that the EVEs are active in cells and possibly doing something functional,” says Ms Harding.

Out of more than 130 known viral families, three were seen again and again throughout the marsupial species.

Bornaviridae, Filoviridae and Parvoviridae are commonly seen in eutherian (or placental) mammals, including humans. Ms Harding says she noticed a unique trend in marsupials where different parts of the viral genomes were retained as fossils over time.

“It was interesting to see that the DNA blueprints for two viral proteins — the nucleocapsid, which is the shell of the virus, as well an enzyme essential for replication — were very common in the marsupial.

“Our hypothesis is that these two proteins are good targets for antiviral defence, therefore copies of them have been kept in the genome. These copies can block areas of the incoming viral genome so the virus cannot properly make these proteins. Without the proteins, it cannot replicate and the immune system can clear the infection.”

Protected species

The researchers also found evidence for small RNA molecules which are known to target and break down foreign viral RNA strands, adding more weight to the virus-fighting hypothesis.

“I found that some EVEs were spliced from the genome to create siRNA and piRNA — two types of molecules that are used in the immune system of plants and animals including humans,” Ms Harding says.

“These RNA molecules were enriched in the testis of the male marsupials, and may be helping to protect future offspring from viral infections. Marsupials have a very different development to other mammals, and are born without a fully functional immune system, so these small molecules may help them defend them while they are still growing.”

The study was based on the available RNA sequence data of 35 samples from 13 marsupials. Ms Harding hopes future laboratory research will prove their role in viral immunity, which could lead to the development of novel RNA antivirals against a large range of viruses.

Ancient marsupial ‘junk DNA’ might be useful after all, scientists say

" } ["summary"]=> string(82) "Journal Reference: Emma F Harding, Alice G Russo, Grace J H Yan, Paul D Waters,..." ["atom_content"]=> string(7624) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Emma F Harding, Alice G Russo, Grace J H Yan, Paul D Waters, Peter A White. Ancient Viral Integrations in Marsupials: A Potential Antiviral Defence. Virus Evolution, 2021; DOI: 10.1093/ve/veab076

Researchers at UNSW Sydney, who examined the DNA and RNA of 13 Australian marsupial species, believe that viral fossils may be helping protect animals from infection.

“These viral fragments have been retained for a reason. Over millions of years of evolution, we would expect all DNA to change, however these fossils are preserved and kept intact,” says doctoral student and lead researcher Emma Harding, from UNSW’s School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences.

“Our study shows how the viruses buried in the animals’ DNA are used to make what we call non-coding RNAs, which carry out tasks inside the animal cells such as protecting against outside infection.

“The animal DNA has basically grabbed a viral sequence — which used to harm it — and ends up using it for its own benefit.”

If Ms Harding is right, her theory may have important implications for our understanding of the role of viral fossils in our own DNA and the animal kingdom in general. For example, viral fossils can be turned into RNA that binds specifically to the virus — and destroys it — if it tries to infect the cell again.

“This could be a mechanism similar to vaccination, but is inherited through generations. By keeping a viral fossil, the cell is immunised against future infection.

“If we can show it occurring in marsupials, it may also be occurring in other animals, including humans.

“So if we look more closely at the viral fossils inside our DNA, we could potentially get clues about how they may be protecting us,” Ms Harding says.

Evolutionary rewind

To understand how Ms Harding arrived at her conclusions, it’s worth stepping back a hundred million years to a time when Australia was once part of the Gondwanaland super-continent along with South America, Africa and Antarctica.

Scientists think the first marsupials originated in South America and later migrated to Australia via Antarctica. The lack of competing mammals in these southern regions may have allowed the marsupials to further evolve, with about 250 species now living in Australia, and about 120 in South America.

Ms Harding says when we look at the genetic makeup of Australian marsupials, the presence of viral fossils, known as endogenous viral elements (EVEs), are like time stamps marking when an animal was infected.

“My research looks at EVEs in Australian marsupials to firstly identify what types of viruses have integrated, and secondly investigate if they play an active role in the marsupial cells.

“One of the EVEs I found was from the Bornaviridae family of viruses, which first entered the animals’ DNA during the time of the dinosaurs when the South American and Australian landmasses were still joined together.

“Bornaviridae viruses were previously thought to have evolved 100 million years ago. But the one I found in almost every marsupial DNA we looked at puts it at 160 million years old — so it was great to be able to contribute to our knowledge of evolutionary history.

“By understanding how viruses have evolved, we can predict how they may change in the future, and plan strategies to prevent outbreaks.”

The work

The researchers examined multiple transcriptomes — the collection of all RNA in a cell — of Tasmanian devils, tammar wallabies, long-nosed bandicoots, fat-tailed dunnarts, bare-nosed wombats, koalas and sugar gliders. They also looked at single transcriptomes of a false antechinus, Southern brown bandicoot, striped possum, Western pygmy possum, brushtail possum and a yellow-footed rock wallaby.

They used the genetic sequence of modern viruses, such as Ebola and Zika, to hunt through the transcriptomes and look for matches — fragments of ancient marsupial viruses. The benefit of searching through the transcriptome rather than the genome is that it finds viral fragments that are still ‘switched on’ and transcribed — making RNA in the cells of marsupials, as opposed to stagnant fossils.

“Transcription is evidence that the EVEs are active in cells and possibly doing something functional,” says Ms Harding.

Out of more than 130 known viral families, three were seen again and again throughout the marsupial species.

Bornaviridae, Filoviridae and Parvoviridae are commonly seen in eutherian (or placental) mammals, including humans. Ms Harding says she noticed a unique trend in marsupials where different parts of the viral genomes were retained as fossils over time.

“It was interesting to see that the DNA blueprints for two viral proteins — the nucleocapsid, which is the shell of the virus, as well an enzyme essential for replication — were very common in the marsupial.

“Our hypothesis is that these two proteins are good targets for antiviral defence, therefore copies of them have been kept in the genome. These copies can block areas of the incoming viral genome so the virus cannot properly make these proteins. Without the proteins, it cannot replicate and the immune system can clear the infection.”

Protected species

The researchers also found evidence for small RNA molecules which are known to target and break down foreign viral RNA strands, adding more weight to the virus-fighting hypothesis.

“I found that some EVEs were spliced from the genome to create siRNA and piRNA — two types of molecules that are used in the immune system of plants and animals including humans,” Ms Harding says.

“These RNA molecules were enriched in the testis of the male marsupials, and may be helping to protect future offspring from viral infections. Marsupials have a very different development to other mammals, and are born without a fully functional immune system, so these small molecules may help them defend them while they are still growing.”

The study was based on the available RNA sequence data of 35 samples from 13 marsupials. Ms Harding hopes future laboratory research will prove their role in viral immunity, which could lead to the development of novel RNA antivirals against a large range of viruses.

Ancient marsupial ‘junk DNA’ might be useful after all, scientists say

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